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OWARD COLLEGE 

1914 




BENSON 

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Kp year book oj 

Ho\\^ara College 

Birmingham, Ala. 



PublisKed annually by tne 

Senior Class 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

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http://archive.org/details/entrenous1914howa 




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IF3 

^ ■ ^H In preparing this, tke 

^ Hfeai^l fifth volume of "Entre 

^ Nous," it has not been our aim 

^ to accomplish an3)thing wonaer 

^ ful or extraordinary, but it has 

^ been our sole purpose to reflect 

^ the real atmosphere of Howard. 

= E\)er37 department of college life 

^ has been represented to the best 

= of our ability. As to how x\'ell 

= v^e have succeeded, you are the 

= judge. We have done our best; 

^ none can do more. 









m^:^^ 




Book I 
Book II 
Book III 

Book IV 
Book V 



TKe College 
The Classes 

Organizations 
Atkletics 

Miscellaneous 




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Intre Nous 



DEDICATION 





O tnose ^>;'ho by ^'ears spent witnin ^= 

these -vOaWs \\a-Oe grown ricK in the ^= 

traditions of the college, proud of ^= 

Ker past, and strong in lo})al zeal ^= 

for Ker future; x\)Ko \\a-^e gone out = 

rr^ from Ker precincts to ao Ker Konor in KigK places ^E 

^ and credit e\'ery vjKere ; wKo Kave added to Ker ^^ 

^ prosperity) in material tKings, and enricKed Ker ^= 

~ dovJer of s^JmpatK^) and lo\)e, to tKem because tKey ^= 

^ Ka\'e puzzled over tKe same perplexities as ours, . ^ — -_ 

^E Ka\'e met tKe same pleasures witK a zest as keen rrr 

~^ — to tKe alumni and former students of Hox\?ard, ^= 

^= everywKere — tKis \'olume is affectionately) and ^^ 

^E fraternally? dedicated by tKe Editors and Senior ^^ 

^^=^ Class. ' — - 



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Contributors 



Artists 



Miss Haywood Molton 
Mrs. C. C. Brown 



Miss Menona Ai.ford 
Miss Jessie Macon 



Mr. John R. Robertson 

Writers 

Miss Madeline Keene 
Miss Lucy Jones 
Mr. Chas B. Kincry 

The Editors are also esperiall"/ indebted to Prof. E. P. Burns 
and lo Mrs. L. A. Keene for ttieir valuable and generous assistance. 



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Dr. S. S. Sherman 
first president howard college 



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A History of Howard College 




T was in August, 1833, that Howard College had its birth in plan. The 
Alabama Baptist State Convention was then in session, and it was resolved to 
found a school for the training of ministers of the Gospel, and for "the im- 
provmg of the ministry of the Baptist denomination." It was the decision 
of the aforesaid body to combine manual labor with mental training, and 
accordingly a farm of three hundred and fifty acres was purchased near 
Greensboro, Alabama. 

1 hree years later came the panic of 1837, and that together with 
the poor financial basis upon which the plan was necessarily pitched forced 
the sale of the property, and the first effort came to naught. 

But m November, 1841, the Convention, then in session at Talladega, Alabama, 
reopened the subject, and it was resolved to "establish a college of high moral character," 
and a plan for its endowment was proposed. An agent was appointed, and Marion, 
Perry County, Alabama, was the place chosen for the location of the college. 

So it was that in January of the year 1842 Howard College became a reality. 
Its first president was Prof. S. S. Sherman, a graduate of Bowdoin College, and on 
the morning of the opening he, as president and only teacher, in a modest wooden 
building, with nine boys under him, stood resolutely upon the threshold of a glorious 
era, and began into the years a steady march, which was never to lag again. 

I he college grew, and before the year was out the enrollment was thirty-one. 
In the fall of 1842 a charter was obtained, and a plan started for the endowment 
of a Chair of Theology. Two years later the entire amount had been subscribed. 
It was in the second year of the institution's existence that three professors were 
added to meet its growth. 

In 1844 came the first of two material discouragements. The college building 
was destroyed by fire, and only some of the paraphernalia was saved. However, new 
grounds were immediately purchased and a new building erected. It became ready for 
occupancy in I 846, and college routine was again resumed. 

It is interesting to note, from this period, the growth of the college through gradation 
or classes. In the beginning Howard was only a preparatory school, and a student 
was able to pursue courses of study only through the sophomore year. But during the 
session of 1846-47 a junior class was established, and the next year, 1847-48, a senior 
class was formed and seven were graduated, four with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
and three with the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

The next important change in the history of the institution came in 1852, when 
Professor Sherman resigned the presidency. Dr. Talbird was then elected to fill the 
important trust. He served nobly until the war interrupted the work. 

On the night of October 15, 1854, came the second and most crushing discour- 
agement. It was what is known to those the more familiar with Howard's history as 
"The Fire." The building had been personally inspected by Dr. Talbird, and all of 
the students had retired. About midnight came the soul-piercing cry of "Fire. " It 
came from Harry, the faithful negro janitor and slave belonging to Dr. Talbird. His 



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heroism on that night was a thing to be praised, and the "Fire" could not be mentioned 
without remembering with inspiration the work of Harry. He it was who discovered 
the fire and madly raced from floor to floor and from room to room, arousing the 
students. Frequently he came in contact with the flames, but not once did he falter. 
When he had visited every room and apprised the inmates of their peril, he sought 
for himself a means to escape. But the only alternative was to leap from a high 
window. He sprang out and fell to the ground unconscious, his clothes burned from 
his body and his hair and eyebrows burned away. Harry lived only a short while, but 
he had made the most noble sacrifice man is capable of. He gave his life for 
others. 

But the friends of Howard rallied to its support. Within one year Rev. J. H. 
DeVotie as financial agent had raised forty thousand dollars for new buildings and 
further endowment. Prof. Davis drew plans for the new buildings, which, when 
completed, served until the removal of the college to East Lake, Alabama, in 1887. 

The war between the States greatly retarded Howard's progress. After Dr. 
Talbird resigned to go to the war the enrollment decreased rapidly. The corps of 
professors was cut to two, and at last, in 1862, the Confederate authorities made appli- 
cation for the use of the buildings for hospital service. The request was granted and 
the college suspended until after the war. 

In 1 865 the college was reopened with Dr. J. L. M. Curry as president. After 
his resignation, Prof. Thornton served one year as president. Following him came Samuel 
R. Freeman, who guided the destinies of the institution from 1869 to 1870. On his 
resignation Col. J. T. Murphree was installed as president, and for sixteen years ren- 
dered invaluable service to Howard College. He resigned in 1887, when it was 
decided to remove the institution to East Lake, Alabama. 

After having discussed the removal of the college at a previous meeting of the 
State Convention, the question came up again at a subsequent meeting at Union 
Springs, Alabama, in 1887. After a spirited debate it was decided in favor of the 
change. Land was purchased in East Lake, and the college was opened there in October, 
1887. Dr. Dill was elected Chairman of the Faculty for the session of 1887-88. In 
the summer of 1888 Rev. B. F. Riley was elected president, he serving in that 
capacity until the summer of 1893. Rev. A. W. McGaha succeeded him. In 1896 
Dr. McGaha declined re-election, and Prof. A. D. Smith was made Chairman of 
the Faculty for the year 1896-97. Prof. Smith resigned at the end of the session, 
and Prof. F. M. Roof was made Chairman of the Faculty to succeed him. Prof. Roof 
continued until 1902, when he resigned. In the fall of that year Dr. A. P. Montague 
accepted the presidency, and served faithfully until 1912, when he resigned to accept 
another college presidency in Florida. Dr. J. M. Shelburne was elected as his suc- 
cessor, taking the reins in January, 1913. Dr. A. J. Moon served as Chairman of the 
Faculty for the half session from September to January of the session 1912-13. 

Thus we reach the present. Without a doubt a new day has dawned for Howard. 
With the coming of the new president there came also new confidence well placed, and 
optimism and enthusiasm, which make themselves so strongly felt. This article has but 
to deal with the "history of the institution." History, termed, is the past, but if the 
past is any criterion of the future, if loyalty and love count for aught, there is, besides a 
glorious past, a more glorious future for Howard College. 

BuNYAN Damk, Jk., '14. 



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RENFROE HALL 



BUILDING D HOMT < 




RENFROE HALL 



BUILDING D HOME OF PROF. DAWSON 



MAIN BUILDING 



SIGMA NU CHAPTER HOUSE 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 
CHAPTER HOUSE 



MONTAGUE HALL 




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Commencement, 1914 



Baccalaureate Sermon, by Samuel Chiles Mitchell, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. 

Sunday, I I :00 A.M May 24 

Sermon to Student Volunteers, by Rev. H. B. Woodward 

Sunday, 8:00 P.M May 24 

Last Chapel Exercises and Roll Call 

Monday, 9 :00 A.M May 25 

Junior Oratorical Contest 

Monday, 10:30 A.M May 25 

Play, "The Taming of the Shrew," under the direction of the Department of English 

Monday, 8 :00 P.M May 25 

Reunion of Class 1898. Alumni Oration 

Tuesday, 10:30 a.m May 26 

Alumni Dinner 

Tuesday, noon May 26 

Annual Reception 

Tuesday, 4 :00 P.M May 26 

Senior Class Play 

Tuesday, 8:00 P.M May 26 

Graduation Exercises and Baccalaurate Address 

Wednesday, 10:30 a.m May 27 



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Board of Trustees 



James B. Ellis. PraiJcnl Selma, Ala. 

A. D. Smith, Vice-Presidenl Birmingham. Ala. 

P. C. RatlifF, SccTclary Birmingham. Ala. 

First Division — Terms Expire in 1914 

A. W. Bell Anniston, Ala. 

R. E. Pettus Hunlsville, Ala. 

L. LassiTER Montgomery, Ala. 

D. C. Cooper Oxford, Ala. 

J. C. Wright Roanoke, Ala. 

J. W. Minor Birmingham. Ala. 

W. R. Milliard Birmingham, Ala. 

W. J. E. Cox Birmingham. Ala. 

H. J. Willincham Florence, Ala. 

Terms Expire in 1915 

W. M. Blackwelder Birmingham, Ala. 

J. A. French Eufaula. Ala. 

W. C. Davis Columbia 

Wm. A. Davis Anniston, Ala. 

W. C. Crumpton 

p. C. RaTLIFF Birmingham. Ala. 

A. D. Smith Birmingham. Ala. 

D. H. Marbury Marbury. .Ala. 

S. W. Welch Talladega, Ala 



Terms Expire in 1916 

J. B. Ellis Selma, Ala. 

J. T. Ashcraft Florence, Ala. 

G. D. Motley Gadsden, Ala. 

W. p. McAdory Birmingham, Ala. 

J. C. Maxwell Alexander City. Ala. 



G. LowERY Birmingham, Ala 

W. Beasley 



R. KeYTON Dothan, Ala 

D. HeacOCK Birmingham, Ala 



Trustees of Endowment Fund 

A. W. Bell D. C. Cooper Wm. A. Davis 

A. D. Smith 



J. B. Ellis 



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James Madison Shelburne, 
A.M.. Th.M., D.D. 

President of the College 

A. M., Georgetown College, 1897; D. D., ibid, 
1907; Th. M., Southern Baptist Theological Sem- 
inary, 1900. 



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Allen J. Moon, A.B., A.M., L.H.D. 

Professor of Creek, onj Latin 

A. B., Linevllle College. 1896; A. B. Howard Col- 
lege, 1897; A. M., Howard College, 1902; Teacher 
Hartselle College, 1897-99; Student University of 
Virginia, 1899-1901; Student University of Chicago, 
Summer Quarters, 1903, 1909, and 1913; Professor 
of Latin, Rawlings Institute, Virginia; Professor of 
Greek and Latin, Howard College since 1901; Presi- 
dent of Society of Alumni, 1938-09; Fellow Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1910-11. 



John C. Dawson, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Modern Languages 

A. B., Georgetown College, 1901; Principal Scotts- 
boro, Alabama, Baptist Institute, 1 981 -"03; Studied 
in Germany and France, Spring and Summer 1903, 
in Germany in 1907; University of Caen, France, 
1909; Student Cornell University, Summer 1904; 
University of Chicago, Summer 1903; Editor of 
Picard's "La Petite Ville"; Instructor in Modern 
Languages in Summer School for Teachers, Uni- 
versity of Alabama, in 1911; Professor of Modern 
Languages in Howard College since 1913. 




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James A. Hendricks, A.B., A.M.. Sc.B. 

Profeaor of Economics and History, and Instructor 
in the Bible 

A. B. and A. M.. Howard College, 1892; Th. B.. 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, 
1895; Student of Church History, Union Seminary, 
New York, 1902-03; Graduate Student Columbia 
University, New York; Graduate Student University 
of Chicago, Summer Quarters, 1 908-'09-' lO-'l 1 ; 
Professor in Howard College since 1903. 



Alfred H. Olive. A.B.. A.M. 

Professor of Chemistr)) and Pb\)sics 

A. B., Howard College, 1905; A. M., Wake For- 
est, 1906; Instructor and Student at Wake Forest, 
1905-'06; Instructor and Student Cornell University, 
1906-'07; Professor of Chemistry and Physics in 
Howard College since 1907. 




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George W. Macon, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 

A. B., Howard College. 1884; A. M., Howard 
College; Ph.D., University of Alabama; Graduate 
Student Columbia University, New York, and Brook- 
lyn Biological Institute, New York; Professor in 
Howard College; Professor of Biology, Mercer Uni- 
versity, Georgia, 1895-1903; Dean of Howard Col- 
lege, I90S-'I0. 



Percy P. Burns, A.B. 

Professor of English 

A. B., Howard College, 1904; Professor in South 
Carolina Co-Educational Institute, I904-'I0; Prin- 
cipal Howard College High School, Acting Profes- 
sor of English, Commandant, I9II-'I2; Student Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Summer Quarters. 1913; Pro- 
fessor of English in Howard College since 1912; 
Secretary of Alumni Association, 1913. 




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Theophiles R. Eagles, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Malhemalics 

Student Atlantic Christian College. I902-'03; Teach- 
er Public Schools of North Carolina, 1903-"04; 
A. B.. University of North Carolina. 1908; Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics, Catawba College, 1908-09; 
Professor of Mathematics, Bethany College, 1910-13; 
A. M., University of North Carolina, 1912; Instruc- 
tor in Mathematics, University of North Carolina, 
1910-'13: Professor of Mathematics, Howard Col- 
lege, 1913. 



James Romulus Edwards, A.B,, B.D. 

Instructor in Fahlic Speal(ing 

Prepared at Mt. Vernon Springs Academy, N. C; 
at Wake Forest College. N. C. 1889-1890; A. B.. 
Colgate University, 1894; B. D., Colgate Univer- 
sity, 1897; Pastorates in Brooklyn, N. Y., Washing- 
ton, D, C, and Birmingham, Ala. 




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RiENZi Thomas 

Director of Clee Club 



C. B. KiNGRY 

Adjutant 




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Alumni Association 



W. A. Berry, President Birmingham. Ala. 

Jno. W. Stewart, Vke-Prei'ulenl Birmingham, Ala. 

Percy P. Burns, Secrelary-Treasurcr Birmingham, Ala. 



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Mrs. J. C. HocKETT 

COMMERCIAL INSTRUCTOR 



Mrs. Harris 

MATRON 



Mrs. E. M. Haggard 
assistant librarian 



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Committees of the Faculty 



Athletics — Professors Noojin and Macon. 

Buildings and Grounds — Professors Olive and Macon. 

Catalogue and Other Publications: — Professors Dawson and Eagles. 

Classification of Students: 

(a) For Students Entering College — Professors Dawson and Eagles. 

(b) For all Other Students Below Seniors — Professors Burns and Olive. 

(c) For Seniors and Post-graduates — The President and Professor Macon. 
Health of Students — Professors Eagles and Noojin. 

Library and Reading Room — Professors Olive and Hendricks. 

Lectures and Public Entertainments — Professors Hendricks and Macon. 

Positions for Graduates — The President and Secretary of Faculty. 

Publicity — Professors Burns and Noojin. 

Schedule and Curriculum — Professors Dawson and Olive. 

Scholarships — The President and Treasurer. 

Student Organizations and Petitions — Professors Moon and Hendricks. 



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SENIOR CLASS MASCOT 



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John J. Milford, A.B. 

Birmingham. Ala. 

PHILOMATHIAN 

flass SetTftaiy 'l:!-'H; Valiilictorian of 
Ministerial Class '14. 

"He was a man. take him for all in all. W< 
shall not look upon his like again." 



William C. Tisdale, A.B. 

Evergreen. Ala. 

FRANKLIN 

■Varsity Baseball. lO-'ll. '1 1-'12. •12-'13, 
■n--14; Varsity Football. 11-12. •12-'13. 
•13-'H: Capt. Baseball. 'll-T.'. 'U'-'IS. 
'13-"14: llanaKer Baseball. 'll-'U': Win- 
ner Hidb .liinip. '13; Winner Broad 
.lump, 'l.": ■Kiilri'-Nou.s" Board. '14. 

"Always on the job" (al Sixty-fourth St.) 



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G. Ira Dunsmore, A.B., 'i^ I 

Stanton, Ala. 

FRANKLIN 

Vici'-I'ros. Frcshniaii Cliiss. 'lii-'ll; f'on- 
U'staiiL Newman .Medal, 'lo-'ll; Con- 
testant Wall<ci- I'.-rcy Medal. •lO-'ll; 
'Vaisit.v Foutljall, 'lO-'ll; 'Vaislty Track 
Team, lO-'ll, 'H-'U', •12-'13; Contestant 
■Sophomore Medal, '12; Sergeant Major, 
'12-'i;i; Sub Pileher 'Varsity Baseball, 
'13; CoUeB.- Uepresentat ive in Inter-eol- 
legiate l)il)atint4 Contest, 'i:!-'ll; Col- 
lese Heijresinlallve in Inter-eoUesiate 
oralorieal Contest. '11; "Kntre-Noiis" 
Hoard, '11. 

He'd undertake to prove by force of argument 
thai man is no animal. He'd prove a buzzard 
is no fowl, and that a load may be an owl. 



Albert Sidney Lee, A.B. 

New Decatur, Ala. 

PHILOMATHIAN 

Freshman Class Historian: Senior class 
Historian, 'H; l-*rtMiminar>' Contestant 
State (Jratorieal Contest. '14; Instrnetor 
in (lieek in Ilisli .Sehool Uepailnienl, 
•i;!-'U. 



"Sil 



ence is a marii 



k of 



wisdom. 



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Jas. a. Ward, A.B. 

Harlford, Ala. 

FRANKLIN 

Secretary ."-"Dphiminro Class '11-12; Con- 
testant Sophomore .Medal, 'll-'li;: An- 
niversary Speaker for Franklin Literary 
Soelety. 'U'-"i:;: S.nlor ("lass Pci, 
•i:i--n. 

"Don't try lo estimate what there is in a quiet 
fellow. " 



Robert Salter Ward, A.B. 

Harlford, Ala. 

FRANKLIN 

Winner oi .Niwmaii .Medal. '12 ; Win- 
ner Soldiershij) Medal. '12: Vice-Pres- 
ident Junior Class. ■12-'1.1: Vice-Pres- 
ident Senior Class. 'i;!-'H. 

Principal occupation is driving dull care away 
by looking at a certain photograph. 



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Robert Robinson, A.B., // K A 

Thorsby, Ala. 

PHILOMATHIAN 

'Varsity Koolball. 'll-'li. 'li-'lH, 'lli-'U: 
•Vaislly Ba.sil)all. ll-'li. 'U-'IS, 'IS-U; 
Trcasuier V. M. ( ', A.. '12-'1S; Captain 
'Varsity P"oc)tl)all. '13; Winner of Diiubles 
In Tennis Tournament. 'H; "Entre- 
Noiis" Hoard. '11: M.iiibc-r I'an-Hrllcnic 
Ciiuiicil, ■i:',-'14. 

Came from where his parents slill reside. Now 
divides his lime between Underwood and Sev- 
enty-fourth Street. His long suit was football, — 
now it's "hearts". 



Ira Frf:d Simmons, A.B., // A' .1 



M 



, Ala 



onroevilte 

FRANKLIN 

("la-ss Historian. 'U-'IU; Contestant New- 
man Medal. '10; Class I'oet. '11-'12. 
'12-'13; Contestant .lunior Oialorlcai 
Medal, 'IS; Captain Track Team, 'll-'lj; 
Manager Track Team, '12-'i;l; Junior 
Asst. Mgr. Football, 'l'2-'l:i; Msr. Scrub 
Football, 'l^-'Ki, 'i;!-'14: President V. M. 
C. .\.. '1.'!-'14; President Athletic Asso- 
ciation. •i:!-'U; President Glee Club, 
'i:!-ll; lOdilor-in-Chief of "Kntre-Nous", 
'13-'14. 

"What hath night to do with sleep?" 



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George Washington Bouldin, A.B. 

Tokyo, Japan 

PHILOMATHIAN 

Th.B.. Southern Baplisi Tin iil..f;i<al 
Seminary; Th.M. ibid. 

"A man who holds his fellow man above every- 
ihmg else." 



Rov Alfred Jones, A.B., // /\ A 

Newton, Ala. 

PHILOMATHIAN 

Contestant Sophomore Medal. '12; Class 
Poet. 'll-'U'; "Knt re-Nous" Bnard. "14. 

Expects lo lake a post course in Math. (?) 



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Earl Parker, A.B. 

Lineville, Ala. 

PHILOMATHIAN 

Wimi.M- Xcwinaii Medal. 12; (Contest- 
ant Soijlioniore Medal. 12; Secretaiy 
.Junior Class, '12-'i:!; Chaiiman of C'om- 
niiltee on selection of Class Souvenir, 
Invitations and Senior I'lay. 'II. 

'Mingle a little folly with your wisdom. 



Earl Wayne Holmes 

Montgomery, Ala. 



FRANKLIN 



Contestant Xi^winan 
rriipliit .'Senior Clas.~. 



M. 



dal. 
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The Human Alarm Clock of the third floor. 
His melancholy howling may be heard around 
the campus at any hour of the night. 



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Oscar Samuel Causey, A.B., 2 A 

Healing Springs. Ala. 

FRANKLIN 

Tiaok Team, 'll-li. 'IS-'n; 'Vaisit.v 
Footliall. '12-'i:!. '13-'14: Contestant 
Junior Oratorical Contest. '13; Junior 
Class Historian. '12-'13; Mgr. 'Varsity 
Football Team. '13: Ku.<iiness Mgr. 
■Eiilrc-.Vfuis', Ti-'lt: I.ilnarian, 'i:!-14. 

Post courses are required to insure "health, hap- 
piness, and success." "There is only one girl 
for me." 



Joseph F. Duke, A.B., Ji .V 

Gadsden. Ala. 

FRANKLIN 

.\sst. Hasiball Mgv.. 11-12: Winner of 
Doubles in Tennis Tournament. '14; 
Temporary President Han-Hellenie Coun- 
cil. '13-'H; "Entre-Nous" Board. 

Is a first-rate authority on how to flirt with tv/o 
girls at once — having carried along successful ex- 
periments in that line. 



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BuNYAN Davie, Jr., A.B., 2 A' 

Clayton, Ala. 

PHILOMATHIAN 

Winner SuiilicMirni' Drchinuition .Medal. 
■ll-']2; I'l-esiilenl .liiriior <'lass. '12-'i:!; 
•Varsity Footliall, 'IJ-l:!; Chapel Clior- 
ister. "i'2-"lX: Wiiuici- .luniur Mratiirieal 
Contest, 'i->-'i:',. 

Has a musical turn of mind and gives vent to 
his aspirations in the stringed orchestra. 



Wm. Henry Carson, A.B. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

PHILOMATHIAN 
Contestant Xewman Xleilal. 'OT-'O!?; 
Deljater I'or I'liilomatliie Anniversary. 
•O.S-'Oli; UiKsinoss iMKr. ■■Kntre-Ninis". 
'Oil-'IO; I'resirtent Freshman Class. 'Ott- 
'10; Second Liiut. Co. C. 'lO-'ll; Sec- 
retary Sophomore Class, 'lO-'ll; Con- 
testant .Junior (Oratorical Sledal. 'li-']3; 
Capt. Co. .\.. •12-'13; Winner of Sword 
Contest State Oratorical Contest, '13- 
'H: Presdent Senior Class, 'IS-'H; 
Deliverer of Senior I'lns. 'lO-'ll. '12-'13; 
Chapel Chorister Three Terms. 

"We may live without friends, 
We may live without books. 
But analyzed man 

Cannot live without cooks." 



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James D. Thompson. A.B. '7' 1 
franklin 

riass PresUlent. 'lO-'ll; Chairman Slis- 
sionary Commlttt'e. "ll-'li: Pr.-sklent 
XIrrollam Missionary Society: Chairman 
Bible Study Cnnimittee; President Sopho- 
more Class; Meilal on "RlBht of Seces- 
sion", 'IS-'n; "Entre Nous" Board '13- 
•14. 



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a^i4 PIntre Nous 



History of the Senior Class 




N the fall of '10 our class had its beginning. There were twenty-nine of 
us as Freshmen, and we well deserved the name which we bore, for we 
were quite "fresh " and "green." It is interesting to notice that of this 
twenty-nine only five are in the Senior class. Two members of the Fresh- 
man class, by extra work and summer courses, graduated last year. 
Three members of this class, because of the cares of the world and the 
deceitfulness of riches, failed to make the Senior class and are spending 
another year as Juniors. The other nineteen have fallen by the way- 
side, and were it not for the fact that we received new members in the Sophomore and 
Junior years the Senior class of ' I 4 would be quite small. All of which goes to prove 
that to reach the point of being a Senior is clearly a test of the survival of the fittest; 
those who have no "sand" and "grit" can never reach this blissful state; they fall out 
long ere this point is attained. 

As Sophomores we felt quite exalted and overly iwse. The "greenness" and 
"freshness" of the previous year had begun to wear off somewhat, and we were seeing 
new visions and dreaming new dreams. The suddenness of this change caused us to 
feel a little "puffed up," and we often felt it our duty even to instruct the members 
of the Faculty. Pope must have been thinking of Sophomores when he wrote these 



"A little learning is a dangerous thing; 
Drink deep or taste not the Pierian spring." 

Our Junior year was a period of "lopping off." The folly of the previous year 
began to dawn upon us, and we began to rid ourselves of the bad habits and wrong 
impressions which we formed during the Sophomore period. We can still hear Prof. 
Olive, in that happy way of his, saying to the very wise members of his classes: "It is 
just as important to learn that you don't know some things as it is to learn that you 
do know other things." It was in the Junior year that the thought first dawned upon 
us that there were some things that we didn't know. We even learned the full signifi- 
cance of the name which we bore the previous year, I'O^F— ZiJ/'l. (wise fool, 
Sophomore-wise fool). So in view of this wonderful discovery, we began to apply 
ourselves to our studies, and this resulted in wonderful progress. 

We are now Seniors, and what a marvelous transformation four years of college life 
has brought about! For four long years we have applied ourselves to the tasks which 



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confront college students. We have worked through volumes of English literature, as 
well as French, German, Greek, and Latin — not to mention the Math, formulae safely 
stored away in our "brain cells" for future reference. With just one more examination 
before us, we will have come to the realization of long-cherished hopes; so naturally we 
are filled with an expressible ecstacy, and spend much of our time in dreaming about 
what the future has in store for us. 

The class of '14 is one of the largest in the history of the college. We are 
well represented in all the phases of college life. In athletics there are "Slick" Tisdale, 
star football and baseball player; Capt. "Red" Robinson, also star football and 
baseball player; Causey, Manager football; and Joe Duke and "Red" Robinson, 
champion tennis players. In oratory we are well represented by Dunsmore, Lee, and 
Carson, Dunsmore winning first honors. 

It may be of inetrest to state that there are eight preachers in our class. They 
are: Carson, Bouldm, Lee, Milford, Thompson, Holmes, Simmons, and Parker. 
Thompson, Holmes, and Simmons are student volunteers. In the medical world we 
are to be represented by Causey, Tisdale, J. A. Ward, R. S. Ward, Robmson, 
Kingry, and Davie. Simmons is to become a medical missionary. Joe Duke will 
teach for a while and will probably then take up the study of law. We feel especially 
honored in having as a member of our class Mr. G. W. Bouldin, who is a graduate 
of the Seminary at Louisville, and who, for the past seven years, has been a missionary 
to Japan. 

As to literary societies and fraternities the class is divided as follows: Eleven 
Franklins, seven Philomathian, nine non-fraternity men and nine fraternity men. The 
fraternity men are: Sigma Nu, Causey, Duke, and Davie; Pi Kappa Alpha, Simmons, 
Jones, and Robinson; Psi Delta, Dunsmore, Kingry, and Thompson. 

The members of the class of '14 feel that the world is soon to feel a mighty 
impulse, inasmuch as we are soon to go forth from these walls — each to find his place 
and to render his service in the uplift and progress of the race. And whatever success 
we may attain, to our Alma Mater with its splendid faculty shall be ascribed much 
of the honor and glory. 



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"A Nightmare" 



1 had a sad and freakish dream 

Thai turned things upside down. 
I dreamed that Holmes couldn't talk, 

That Thompson was a clown. 
I dreamed Fred Simmons wouldn't wear 

A diamond on his shirt. 
That Joseph Duke declared it was 

A wicked thing to flirt. 



I dreamed that G. W. Bouldin joined 

A missionary club. 
And filled his books with heroines 

Who hustled for a hub. 
I dreamed that I. Dunsmore's large teeth 

Were busy chewing gum ; 
That Reverend Carson grew hoarse 

Decrying mint in rum. 



I dreamed that Jones and Robinson 

Sat down to play at cards; 
That R. S. Ward and J. A. Ward became 

Two loving, cooing pards. 
I dreamed that A. S. Lee used slang 

•Til John J. Milford blushed; 
That William C. Tisdale grew mad 

That baseball funds weren't flushed. 



I dreamed that Oscar Causey said, 

"Still keep the armor on, " 
And Davie joined in the refrain, 

"All honored victors thus have won. 
Then I dreamed that Parker had lost 

A twenty dollar bill; 
That was the thing that saved me. 

Or I'd been a dreaming still. 



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Extracts from an Almanac by "Parson" 



1924. 

Jan. I. — Tuesday — Oscar Causey falls in love witli a rich widow. Courting at 

once begins. 

Jan. I 5. — Tuesday — Joe Duke takes oath of office as head of the Salvation Army. 

Feb. I . — Friday — J. A. Ward elected as a policeman in Dundee, Ala. 

Feb. 22. — Friday — Birthday of George Washington and Fred Simmons celebrated. 

March 5. — Wednesday — "Red" Robinson nominated as candidate for the Penitentiary. 
N. B. — "Red" and a pickpocket so favored each other that "Red" was 
taken for the pickpocket. 

March 6. — Thursday — "Red" Robinson found not guilty, but recommended to change 
his face. 

March 24. — Monday — Jeff. Thompson receives an appointment to China. 

March 27. — Thursday — Meeting of railroad conductors. C. B. Kingry chosen presi- 
dent. 

April 2. — Wednesday — Prof. Ira G. Dunsmore, on his tour through Europe, sings 
before the Pope. 

April 1 7. — Thursday — Mass meeting of the unemployed (tramps) in St. Louis. E. 
W. Holmes made chief. 

April 29. — Tuesday — W. H. Carson defends woman suffrage in Alabama. 

April 30. — Wednesday — Oscar Causey proposes and is not accepted. He goes west 
on the same night. 

May 5. — Sunday — Geo. W. Bouldin, A.M., D.D., Ph.D., inaugurated as Presi- 

dent of the Baptist Seminary at Tokyo, Japan. 

May 28. — Wednesday — Reunion of class of 1914 at Howard College. Those 
present were: Lanky Causey, Senator Kingry, Jeff Thompson, Bob 
Ward, Earl Parker, Bill Carson, Joe Duke, Bun Davie, Roy Jones, 
Fred Simmons, Red Robinson, Milford, Lee, Slick Tisdale. Jap 
Bouldin couldn't leave his responsible position. J. A. Ward, being 
the only policeman in Dundee, was unable to get off. Dunsmore was 
on his trip through the Far East. Parson Holmes' car (box car) 
arrived two days later. 

May 29. — Thursday — Roy Jones elected Director of Athletics at Howard College 
for the next year. 

July 4. — Friday — Bunyan Davie celebrates his independence by getting a divorce 

from his sixth wife. 



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July 


29. 


Aug. 


6. 


Sept. 


1. 


Sept. 


2. 


Sept. 


9. 


Sept. 


15. 


Oct. 


8. 


Oct. 


28. 


Nov. 


27. 


Dec. 


23. 


Dec. 


25. 



De 



31.- 



-Thursday — R. S. Ward buys out the L. & N. Railroad. 

-Wednesday — A novel written by A. S. Lee, "Cosmetics," creates a 
sensation over the world. 

-Monday — Labor Day. Earl Parker delivers a lecture on "Loafing in 
Gate City." 

-Tuesday — Manager Tisdale, of the New York Giants, is tendered a 
loving cup. 

-Tuesday — Prof. Dunsmore sings before the Czar. 

-Jeff Thompson sails for Japan. 

-Wednesday — John Milford buys out a moving picture show. 

-Sunday — Bun Davie marries his seventh wife. 

-Thursday — Thanksgiving. The Howard football team, under the ex- 
cellent coaching of Roy Jones, defeats Alabama 31 to 7. 

-Tuesday — Causey returns from the West, and renews his love affair. 

-Thursday — Christmas. J. A. Ward discharged from the police force 
of Dundee because of being caught drunk on duty. 

-Wednesday — Causey and the rich widow united in the Holy Bonds of 
Wedlock by the Rev. A. S. Lee. 



"ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL." 




i^i.4 Pntre Nous 




THE COLLEGE CAT 



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1914 I0NTRE Nous 



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Junior Class 



Colors : Green and White. 



Flower: While Rose. 



Molto : "Immer Treu." 



Officers 

W. D. BlaCKWELDER President 

Bledsoe Kelly Vice-PresiJenl 

Claud D. Boozer Secretar\) 

Benjamin H. Walker, Jr Historian 

Jas. D. Pickens Jester 

Roll 

Wm. D. Blackwelder, II K A . . . Philomathian 

Claud D. Boozer Frankhn 

Harry Brooks Bradley, i) X 

Pearson G. Compton, ^l' A Franklin 

Ben Ellis Dunaway, -"l' A Franklin 

Elmer Lee Ford Franklin 

Chas. McKee Gary, :i X Franklin 

Clarence Kelly Gilder, »I' A Franklin 

Archie Glass Franklin 

Carey LaFayette Harlan, M' A Franklin 

Samuel Spurceon Howell Franklin 

John A. Huff, M' A Franklin 

Bledsoe Kelly, i) .\ Franklin 

L. C. LeftwicH, i; X Philomalhian 

Martin Comen Newman, M' A Franklin 

Jas. D. Pickens Franklin 

John R. Robertson, I[ K .\ Franklin 

Robert Lee Tate, >I' A Franklin 

Sanford a. Taylor Franklin 

Jas. P. Thornberry Philomalhian 

B. H. Walker, Jr., II K .\ . . . . Philomalhian 
Lloyd D. Watson, IX Franklin 



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Oh, Juniors! 



If, as the scientists say, a man's brain becomes smaller as he grows older, just 
think what a one-clyinder aflair Thornberry is getting along with now. 

"Mr. Newman," said Prof. Dawson, "hookworm may be a disease, but, my boy, 
laziness is a habit." 

A young lady friend of Compton's, upon being asked what she thought about 
simplified spelling, replied: "I think the promoters of it should send missionaries to 
Howard College." 

Bradley says that too much nagging from the profs makes a fellow mad. 

In writing a sketch of Washington, Glass ended his essay by saying: "Washington 
married a lamous belle, Martha Custis, and in due time became the father ol his 
country." 

Rumor has it that Dunnaway is such a tight-wad that he won't even tell a joke 
at his own expense. 

Duke: "Don't you know, really, I can't live without you?" 

Miss (?): "Well, be of good cheer, Ed, perhaps papa will pension you for 



hfe." 






When, in his sermon, Taylor declared with great emphasis: "Brethren, procrasti- 
nation is the thief of dimes," what was on his mind? 

Walker says that fishing for compliments is about as productive as fishing for 
trout; you're so likely to land a crab. 

Pickens, noticing in a fashion magazine that our next winter overcoats would 
have a narrow waist and large sleeves, threw the book down in disgust, and turning up 
his eyes to the rack, said: "I know better than that; mine will have a wide waist, narrow 
sleeves and will be slightly worn at the elbows." 



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Mrs. Harris to Garnet: "Son, I noticed Mr. Kelly didn't sleep in church today 
at all; I wonder why?" 

Garnet: "Well, I'll tell you, mamma, he dropped a dime in the basket instead 
of a penny and the mistake got on his nerves." 

A recent discovery has revealed the fact that Boozer's happiness is due to his 
having so little on his brain. 

Ford, passing down the street, stopped in front of the following sign: "Hot 
Waffles with Maple Syrup from 8 A.M. to 5 P.M., 25c." With watering mouth 
he exclaimed: "Gee! Nine hours. I wonder how long they would let me eat for a 
nickel?" 

Huff, placing an order for a large bouquet of flowers, asked that they be sent to 
a certain address and charged to him. "Sure," said the florist, "and your name." 
"Oh! never mind the name, she will know," he said. 

Leftwich (in a French restaurant, after having had three years of college French) : 
"This is awful; I've ordered three dishes from this menu and they are all potatoes." 

Gary was asked by his tailor if he wanted padded shoulders in his coat, and re- 
plied: "Pad the pants; that's where I need it most." 

Gilder, thinking that the EntRE Nous editor might need a number of jokes, 
presented him with a collection and asked: "What will you give me for these?" The 
editor looked them over and replied: "Ten yards start." 

"I will be your Valentine," said Harlan. 

A shadow passed across the fair face of Miss : "I was so in hopes that I 

would not get any comics this year," she said. 

"Oh, mamma!" cried a young lass who had been receiving special attention from 
Blackwelder for two years, "he loves me." 
Mamma: "Has he told you?" 
Young Lass: "No, but he is in the library learning to play chess with papa." 



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History of Junior Class 




E shall not attempt to recount with any degree of fullness the history 
of each member of our class, primarily, because of the numerous deeds of 
each that would have to be mentioned, and also because of a scarcity of 
space. 

The Junior Class of 1913-14 is merely the Sophomore Class of 
1912-13, with the addition of a vast amount of knowledge picked up 
or absorbed by association with "the fellows" and to a slight extent, we 
might say, by coming in contact with the various members of our wise and 
beneficent Faculty. As for books, we have often heard of people making companions 
of them, but we have not yet been able to take this view of the matter. To our minds, 
books are only masses of paper and printing, to be used as any other innate and 
lifeless vehicle. But, for the sake of conventionality, we are sometimes forced to 
burden our minds with a few choice thoughts from said books. 

Being so near the last round in the ladder of college fame, we have almost en- 
tirely forgotten those days of toil and struggle which we spent during our Freshman 
and Sophomore years. We have begun to regard "Rats" as human beings and some- 
times we actually waste a little of our precious time with them. Another transforma- 
tion has come about in connection with our social activities. During our "Rat" year 
and even last year we had a right hard time conducting ourselves gracefully with some 
members of the fair sex, and many a time we felt somewhat nervous at some of the 
more exclusive and formal social functions. But such evidences of greenness have been 
entirely worn off, and we can now handle most any kind of social situation with ruthless 
abandon. To win the heart of a fair maiden has now become a very menial and 
ordinary undertaking. 

A glance at the "World's Almanac" will reveal unto the reader that the Junior 
Class of '13-' 14 is taking its full quota of college honors and is well represented in 
every department of college activities. 



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S0PH0H6RCS 




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Sophomore Class 



Colors: Gold and Navy Blue. 



Flower: Honeysuckle. 



MoHo: "Per aspera ad astra." 



Officers 

Lloyd Watson PresiJent 

D. L. Blackwelder Vice-PrcsiJenl 

Garnet Harris Secrelary 

Watson Walker Historian 

Emory Berkstresser Poet 



Roll 

Emory Berkstresser 

John T. Blackshear Marvin W. Lanier 

D. Lee Blackwelder Lula Mehaffy 

Truman A. Blake Henry Thos. Mills 

Preston Blake, Jr. Jeff Norman, Jr. 

R. Edward Duke Eugene Clay Shaw 

John Inzer Freeman Jas. T. Syring 

Benjamin H. Garner W. T. Tennant, Jr. 

Garnet M. Harris Robert K. Vann 

Chas. a. Hester T. Watson Walker 



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Histon* of Sophomore Class 




T is with a coBTKtiOB of mrnf wlimj tbat tbe wnler altegnfils to sketch t)ie 
IvslQfj of HonrutTs *I6l It wooU take a Tolmr of ^rrat size and 
«■ cJoqaeal pen to give llie das justiGe. 

The class of *I6 has added aaother jear fcUed with wooderfd 
achirveBeals to its history. Just aboot a jrai ago we wete mdetcoag 
the lijMft, ordeal of bciag traasforaKd fnm the gicai Fresh, staler hot 
then, bj hard labor, we have attained the cxahed p o si tioa of learned 



.:w past jear has bcca <]aite socccssfid. In the reahn of class work 

hiaself. aiid the professors will vouch for iL And there 

~:Jdb ia which they haine wrtmght narveloaBhr. In oralorr sooe have soared 

r.d CM the athletic held odwis have woa reaown. 

Now. the SophoMores of *14-*i3. with their rich hcstorj behind thea. stawl i^wa 

the dacshold of JiMiniily. We are iaiafd widi a new hfe: the Bght of a fairer 

daTT is il I III ■■li, apoa ■&. Tim-o more jvars of work stand before tts. bat we shall 

ever coHtinae to drive on. Now. flear reader, watch onr folinv historj. for soon il 

wiD be kaglheBed bj naajr noble deeds and worthy actioas. Look not sn>«ri n ^ly 

oar past, bat keep in niad this 



'.As a strvag tree fnaa a Hitle shrvb grows. 
So wise Seniors rise froai dall Sophoaaorcs.' 



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Alphabet of Sophomores 



A IS for Acton, with his speed galore; 
B is for Blake, with his stiff pompadour. 
B is for Berkstresser, our acrostic poet; 

B is for Blackshear, who has wit and doesn't know it. 
B is for Blackwelder batting the ball; 
F is for Freeman, the tmiest of all. 
G is for Garner, with football skill; 
H IS for Harris, with the tennis pill. 

L is for Lanier, our only man married; 
P is for Powell, the beauty prize carried. 
R is for Robertson, our Co-ed's man ; 
S is for Syring, our volley-ball fan. 

T is for Tate, who will in basketball shine; 
1 is for Tennant, who sings all the time. 
U is for Ussery, who belongs to the lassies; 
V is for Vann, the rider of classes. 

W is for Walker, who over history is bent; 
W is for Watson, our beloved President. 
Z is the end of the A B C 

But our class goes on to eternity. 



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Fresh 



resnman 



ci 



ass 



Colors: Hazy Blue and Lazy Brown. 

Mollo : 



Floiuer : Evergreen. 



"Grow tall and live high." 



Officers 

G. C. Chance President 

Louise McCoy Vice-Presider\l 

Mary Swindall Secretary 

Eugene Dunaway Historian 

Lucy Jones Prophet 



Roll 



H. A. Adams 
Menona Alford 
R. C. Balkcom 

Annie Fay Barnhart 
Preston Blake 
G. C. Chance 

W. W. Chandler 
Alfred Clements 
A. L. Dawson 

J. E. Dunaway, Jr. 
W. R. Griffin 
D. D. Gibson 
J. L. Gilbert 



Lois Hendricks 
Louise McCoy 
Raymond McPhaul 
John McRae 
Olivia R. Massey 
LuLA Mehaffy 
J. E. Newton 
Jeff Norman 
J. E. Parsons 
M. L. Partin 
H. A. Powell 
A. H. Reid 
Virgil Roach 



Lucy Jones Leake Vice 

Clarence Ramsey 

H.S.Wallace 

Guy Ray 



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Chronological History of the Freshman Class 



1913. 

Sept. 7. — Last Sunday at home. Chandler bids his best love farewell and promises 

to be faithful forever. 

Sept. 8. — Monday — Packing day ; very busy for every one. 

Sept. 9. — Tuesday — Leaving home. Ramsey promises on bended knees to study 

hard and not to smoke any cigarettes. Newton, as always, has for- 
gotten to put in some article, so he spends a whole week packing — 
putting in everything. In his hurry he leaves his trunk, 3:30 P. M. 
At 10:30 P. M. he arrives in the "city." 

Sept. 10. — Wednesday — Sleepy after "hard" night's sleep on a pair of springs and 

two bed slats. Our air castles crumble when we are exposed to Prof. 

Dawson for classification. However, we revive upon learning of the 

advent of seven co-eds, all Freshmen. 
Sept. 1 1 . — Thursday — Dead broke after buying German and History books. 
Sept. 1 4. — First Sunday in Birmingham. 

Sept. 15. — First day of recitations — many are disappointed at what they really know. 
Sept. 20. — Balkcom's athletic aspirations are given a knock — gets collar bone broken. 
Oct. 22., 23. — First six week's tests. Boys grades outstripped by those of co-eds. 

Vice makes 99 under Prof. Dawson and gets eleven set-ups. 
Oct. 26. — Football team greatly strengthened by advent of Ray, Newton, Vice. 

McRae, and Wallace. 
Nov. 27. — Thanksgiving Day. Adams and Balkcom star in football game at 

Columbiana. Many Freshmen rats eat their first Thanksgiving dinner 

away from home. Two-year old hens, rice and water enjoyed very 

much. 
Dec. 1 9, 20. — We leave for home for Christmas Holidays. 
Dec. 20, 29. — Short but sweet vacation with the girl we left behind. 
Dec. 30. — Another sad day in the upward journey. McMillan promises never to 

go to see a girl during his college career. 
Dec. 3 I . — Work begins anew. 

1914. 
Jan. 19-23. — Mid-term exams.! Our aspirations are humiliated by our grades. 

Wallace surprises every one by passing in one study. 



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Jan. 26. — Advent of another co-ed into the ranks of the Freshman class. Second 

term begins. 
Feb. 16. — Monday — "Arbor Day." 

Feb. 25. — Pour inches of snow. Faculty and co-eds have battle, — latter victorious. 
March 6. — Tests. Many improve their grades. Boys beat some of the co-eds. 

Vice makes 1 00 in French ! Spring arrives, accompanied by the 

usual spring fever. 
April I . — Freshmen celebrate their class day by missing every lesson. 




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Freshman Class Prophecy 




E had reached Chicago at last, and you can't imagine how glad we were 
Just as I was stepping off the train I heard a voice calling me, and. 
turning around, I saw Mr. Adams. He told me that he was a tobacco 
drummer, and that Mr. Chance was teachmg school. I talked to him 
until his train came. 

The day had been cloudy, but then a ray of sunlight came out, and 
I saw this sign across the street: "A. L. Dawson Hat Co." I hurried 
— ' across the street and went into the store, finding Mr. Dawson very busy 
trying to sell Mr. Powell and Mr. Chandler some hats. But they declared they must 
have the very best, as they were living advertisements for "Kartus and Weinstein." In 
a chat with them I learned that Mr. Balkcom and Mr. McRae were going to have a 
motorcycle race that afternoon at the exposition. 

As I came out I saw a big, fat man with lots of books under his arm. This was 
no other than David Gibson. I noticed that one of the books was "Short Cuts to 
Math," by Lois Hendricks. Of course I inquired about Lois and learned that she 
was teaching at Vassar. 

Mr. Gibson asked me to lunch with him, and we went to the daintiest little place ! 
We had not been there long when I noticed a tall woman come in. David told me 
this was Lula Mehaffey. Soon she saw us and came over, declaring that she was 
going to take care of me. Lula had been married five years and had made Chicago 
her home. Upon her invitation we visited the fair that afternoon. 

At this exposition I saw many curious sights. Among them was Virgil Roach, 
who had joined a show and had at last found his talent. 

Goodness; such noise! Oh, that was only Leake Vice announcing Olivia Massey 
and Raymond McPhaul in an acrobatic stunt. 

Then we saw Mr. Reed, who was manager of the exposition. He gave us tickets 
to the "Ole Plantation" show. In this I recognized Messrs. Partins, Newton, Parsons, 
and Norman. Eugene Dunaway had brought some products from his Alabama farm, 
which won first prize. 

Mr. Wallace and Guy Ray told me how much they enjoyed the sacred bonds 
of matrimony, but Mary Swindall said she was still able to ward off the men. 

Just then an auto with Menonna and Clarence Ramsey in it flew past. I was 
told that she was a trained nurse and he a doctor. I wondered at this. 

We left the exposition just in time to catch a glimpse of Preston Blake, who was 
demonstrating the advantages in "Self-Rising Flour." On our way home I noticed 



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a litlie woman with a bonnet tied under her chin ringing a bell. This was dear old 
Louise. She had been disappointed in love and had joined the Salvation Army. Next 
we came to a large buildmg on which there was this sign: "Barnhart-Tyler Seminary." 
I knew at once that this was Fay and Miriam, but I wondered what they would ever 
be able to teach. As we stood looking at it Bill Griffin came out. He spoke to me 
and asked me to accept the position as organist at his church, for he was pastor of 
one of the largest churches in Chicago. I told him I would think about it, but I 
didn't, for I was so tired when we reached home that I soon slipped off in Dreamland. 



Fresh 



man 



CI 



ass r oem 



We look before and after. 

Bearing well in mind 
The "Sophies" go before us. 

The "Preps" lag on behind. 



So, then, we are the "Freshies;' 
At least they call us so; 

Then tarry for a moment 
And hear our tale of woe. 



The first day we had entered. 
From harsh looks we did learn 

Unless we began to study. 
The way for us would burn. 



We then resolved in earnest 
To be wmners in the strife. 

For we had come from home to college 
To learn the useful life. 



Then from darkest woe to brightest joy 
Our work at once did turn. 

For all true loyal Freshmen 
Their tasks began to learn. 



And when this year is over. 
And the Freshman's battle won. 

We'll call ourselves the "Sophies " 
Till Fifteen's work is done. 



(67) 



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CADE MY 



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B. L. NoojiN 

COACH 

B. L. NoojiN, B.S. 

Principal of the High School anil Ph\/iical Diiector 

B. S., University of Alabama, 1908; Teacher of 
Science and F^hysical Director, Ninth District Agri- 
cultural School, Blountsville, Ala., 1 908" I I ; Teach- 
er of Science and Pliysical Director, Seventh Dis- 
trict Agricultural School, Alhcrtville, Ala., I9||-'|2; 
Principal of I ligh School and i'hysical [director of 
Howard College since 1912. 



(69) 



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E. M. Haggard, A.B. 

INSTRUCTOR IN HIGH SCHOOL 



J. C. HOCKETT. A.B. 
INSTRUCTOR IN HIGH SCHOOL 




(70) 



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J. D. Jackson, A.B. 

INSTRUCTOR IN HIGH SCHOOL 



A. S. Lee 

INSTRUCTOR IN HIGH SCHOOL 




(71) 

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Roll of High School 



John C. Abernathy 
W. W. Adams 
Roger Allen 

F. M. AviLLIONS 

F. A. Bell 
Jones R. Butler 
j. d. burson 
E. Bagwell 
W. P. Breen 
C. G. Burson 
G. Collins 
H. Carlisle 
C. E. Culverhouse 
Jerome Crow 
Roy Colley 
Jimmy Cook 
Fred Carlisle 
C. Cunningham 
A. D. Carlisle 
L. Cranford 
F. C\rmack 

J. F. DURAN 

V. E. Downey 

L. W. DOCKERY 

C. Davis 

F. W. DOSTER 

D. Ensley 
Cleveland Ellis 
C. H. Ferguson 

J. E. GiLMORE 

W. H. Griffin 
Fred Gallant 
P. Harris 

R. H. HoRTON 
W. G. Jackson 
Webb Jordan 

G. W. Jackson 



(73) 




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ROLL OF HIGH SCHOOL 



Paul Jenkins Arthur Zbinden 

C. C. Jones 
M. Jenkins 
C. King 

R. G. Leckie 
W. D. Lewis 

R. LOWERY 

Prough Lewis 
G. P. Ledyard 
K. E. Lemke 
R. Lemke 
J. F. Lavvorn 
Fred Martin 
Jas. a . Moore 
Louis McPhaul 
H. Mason 
D. C. Mason 
Dan Norman 
D. J. Orr 

J. P. Wallace 
John Pitchford 
N. Renfroe 
Vaux Owens 

T. H. Robertson 
C. J. Steele 
T. C. Steeley 
O. Stodghill 
Owen Swindall 
j. w. southerlano 
J. Self 

J. A. Sorrell 
H. Stephens 
S. H. Sadler 
S. A. Thompson 
W. M. Thompson 

W. B. WOODALL 

V. H. Watson 
Gordon Wood 
R. L. Wyatt 
Ward Yeacer W.Wooten 



(74) 



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Editorial Board 

1. F. Simmons Edilor-in-Chicf 

O. S. Causey .... Business Manager J. D. Thompson Societies 

H. B. Bradley . Assistant Business Manager J. F. DuKE Classes 

R. A. Jones Fraternities R. Robinson Organizations 

W. C. TiSDALE Athletics G. 1. Dunsmore Jol(es 



(77) 



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an 



Hell. 



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enic ^ounciJ 



J. F. Duke PrcsiJenl 

R. Robinson First Vice-President 

J. A. Huff Second Vice-President 

W. D. Blackwelder Secretary 

O. S. Causey Assistant Secretary-Treasurer 

G. I. DuNSMORE Treasurer 



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SIGMA NU HALL 



(83) 




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Sigma Nu 



Founded at Virginia M litary Institute in 1869. 
Colon: Old Gold, Black and White. Flomcr : While Rose 

Founders 

James F. Hopkins James M. Riley 

John W. Hopson Greenfield Quarles 

IOTA CHAPTER OF SIGMA NU 

Established in 1879. 

Fratres in Collegio 

Class ok 1914 

Oscar Samuel Cuasey Healing Springs, Alabama 

BuNYAN Davie, Jr Clayton, Alabama 

JosEPHUs Frank Duke Gadsden, Alabam 

Class of 1915 

Harry Brooks Bradley .... Birmingham, Alabama 

Charles M. Gary Midway, Alabama 

Bledsoe Kelly Birmingham, Alabama 

Lewis LeftwICH Lineville, Alabama 

Class of 1916 

Preston Blake Birmingham, Alabama 

John Inzer Freeman Ashville, Alabama 

J. D. Norman Birmingham, Alabama 

Clay Shaw Cuba, Alabama 

Lloyd Watson Hartford, Alabama 

Class of 1917 

B. Daniel Norman Birmingham, Alabama 

Raymond McPhaul Birmingham, Alabama 



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IOTA CHAPTER OF SIGMA NU 



Roll of Chapters 

Leland Stanford. Jr. University 
University of Virginia University of Michigan 



University of N. C. 
Delaware Stale College 
Virginia Military Institute 
Washington and Lee Univ. 
Vanderbilt University 
State University of Ky. 
University of Ga. 
University of Ala. 
Howard College 
N. Georgia Agr. College 
Mercer University 
North Carolina A. and M. College 
Alabama Polytechnic Inst. 

Georgia School of Technology 
Univ. of Pennsylvania 
Bethany College 

Ohio State University 
Ml. Union-Scio College 
University of W. Va. 
LaFayelte College 

Western Reserve University 
Northwestern University 
University of Wisconsin 



University of Chicago 

Albion College 
Lombard University 
Iowa Stale University 

Iowa State College 
University of Minnesota 
University of Nebraska 
Kansas State University 
Missouri Stale University 
William Jewel College 
Missouri School of Mines 

Washington University 
Oklahoma University 
University of Texas 
Louisiana State University 
Tulane University 
University of Arkansas 
Colorado School of Mines 
University of Colorado 
University of Oregon 
University of Montana 
Washington State College 
Lehigh University 



Syracuse University 
Pennsylvania State College 
DePauw University 
Perdue University 
University of Indiana 



University of Illinois University of California 
Case School of Applied Science 
Cornell University 
Rose Polytechnic Institute 
University of Vermont 
Stevens Institute of Technology 
Dartmouth College 
Columbia University 
Brown University 



Emory College 
Stetson University 
Lombard College 
Kansas State Agr. College 
University of Maine 



(86) 



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PI KAPPA ALPHA CHAPTER HOUSE 



(89) 

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Pi Kappa Alpha 



Founded at University of Virginia, on March 1. 1868. 
Colon: Garnet and Old Gold. Floiver : Lily of the Valley 

Founders 

Frederick S. Taylor. B..A Littleton \^'. Tazewell 

Julian E. M'ood, M.D. James B. Schlater 

Robertson Howard. \LD. 

ALPHA PI CHAPTER OF PI KAPPA ALPHA 

Established 1911 

Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1914 

Ira Fred Simmons Monroeville. .Alabama 

Roy Alfred Jones Newton. Alabama 

Robert Robinson Thorsby. Alabama 

Class of 1915 

Wilson Dean Blackwelder .... Birmingham. .Alabama 

Ben Hill Walker Camp Hill. Alabama 

Emmett FitzhL'CH Day Birmingham. Alabama 

Robert Edwin Duke Birmingham. .Alabama 

Class of 1916 

John Reuben Robertson Bessemer. .Alabama 

David Lee Blackwelder Birmingham. .Alabama 

William Tracy Tennant Roanoke. .Alabama 

Gordon ClopTON Ussery Roanoke, Alabama 

Class of 1917 

Willie C. Griffin Cullman, Alabama 

Green Cody Chance .... Union Springs, .Alabama 

Andrew Lewis Dawson Tuscaloosa. .Alabama 

Ransom Carson Balkcom .... Midland City. .Alabama 



(91) 



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ALPHA PI CHAPTER OF PI KAPPA ALPHA 



Roll of Chapters 

University of Virginia University, Virginia 

Da\idson College Davidson. North Carolina 

\X'illiam and Mary College Williamsburg, Virginia 

Southern University Greensboro, Alabama 

University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee 

Tulane University New Orleans. Louisiana 

Southwestern Presbyterian University Clarksville, Tennessee 

Hampden-Sidney College Hampden-Sidney, Virginia 

Transylvania University Lexington, Kentucky 

Richmond College Richmond, Virginia 

Washington and Lee University .... Lexington, Virginia 
University of North Carolina . Chapel Hill, North Carolina 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute Auburn, Alabama 

North Georgia Agricultural College . . . Dahlonega, Georgia 

Kentucky Slate University Lexington, Kentucky 

Trinity College Durham, North Carolina 

Louisiana State University .... Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Georgia School of Technology Atlanta. Georgia 

North Carolina A. & M. College Raleigh. North Carolina 

University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Arkansas 

University of Slate of Florida Gainesville, Florida 

MilUaps College Jackson. Mississippi 

Missouri School of Mines Rolla, Missouri 

Georgetown College Georgetown. Kentucky 

University of Georgia Athens, Georgia 

University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri 

University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, Ohio 

Southwestern University Georgetown, Texas 

Howard College East Lake, Alabama 

Ohio Slate University Columbus, Ohio 

University of California Berkeley, California 

University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 

New York University New York City 

L S. C. — "Ames" Ames, Iowa 

Syracuse University Syracuse, N. Y. 

Rutgers College New Brunswick, New Jersey 

K. S. A. C. — "Manhattan" Manhattan. Kansas 

Pennsylvania State College Stale College. Pennsylvania 



(92) 



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?Z\ DELTA HALL 



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Psi Delta 



Colors : Purple and Gold. 



(Local— Founded in 1900) 



Flower: Violet. 



Founders 

Mel Durant Smith Flavins Hatcher Hawkins 



W. L. Crawford 



Albert Lee Smith 



Fratres in Facultate 

Elias Martin Haggard 
Percy Pratt Burns 
James D. Jackson 



Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1914 

George Ira Dunsmore Stanton, Alabama 

Jeff Davis Thompson Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1915 

Pearson Grady Compton Demopolis, Alabama 

Ben Ellis Dunaway Orville. Alabama 

Clarence Kelly Gilder Carbon Hill, Alabama 

Carey LaFayette Harlan Alexander City. Alabama 

John Amos Huff Birmingham. Alabama 

Martin Comer Newman CoUinsville, Alabama 

Robert Lee Tate Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1916 

John Thomas Blackshear Dothan, Alabama 

Garnett Mitchell Harris Birmmgham, Alabama 

Class of 1917 

Leake Vice Carbon Hill, Alabama 

Charles Bowdon Kingry, (A.M. 1914) Montgomery, Alabama 



(97) 




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(98) 




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NTRE Nous 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 



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Franklin Literary Society 



Founded 1858. 
Colors: Pink and White. 



Roll 

G. P. Ledyard 
J. F. McRae 
M, C. Newman 
T. E. Bagwell G. E. Newton 
R. C. Balkcom D. J. Orr 
J. T. Blackshear George Pappas 
T. A. Blake C. I. Shaw 

C. D. Boozer 1. F. Simmons 

O. S. Causey C. J. Steele 

Grady Collins J. T. Syring 
P. G. CoMPTON R. L. Tate 
Jerome Crow 
Cecil Davis 
A. L. Dawson 
V. E. Downey 
J. F. Duke 
J. E. Dunaway, Jr. 
B. E. Dunaway 
G. I. Dunsmore 
J. I. Freeman 



S. A. Taylor 

W. C. TiSDALE 

G. C. Ussery 

E. L. Vice G. L. Lamberth 
T. W. Walker J. F. Gallant 

J. A. Ward C. M. Gary 

R. S. Ward D. D. Gibson 

L. D. Watson C. K. Gilder 

F. M. Williams a. F. Glass 

W. B. WooDALL W. R. Griffin 
R. L. Wyatt C, L. Harlan 
J. R. Robertson G. M. Harris 

Ward Yeager E. W. Holmes 

J. A. Huff 
George Jackson 
Gladstone Jackson 

Paul Jenkins 
W. W. Jordan 
Bledsoe Kelly 

C. B. KiNGRY 



E. L. Ford H.E.Mason 

Clarence Ramsey 

J. D. Pickens 



(101) 




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(102) 



NTRE Nous 




Philomathic Literary Society 



Founded 1847. 



Roll 



Colors: Sky Blue and White. 



J. C. AbernaTHY 
J. A. Acton 
H. A. Adams 
W. W. Adams 

F. A. Bell 

E. Berkstresser 
D. L. Blackwelder 
W. D. Blackwelder 

G. W. BOULDIN 

W. H. Carson 
G. C. Chance 
W. W. Chandler 



J. L. P. Cook 

B. Davis, Jr. 

L. W. Dockery 
W. T. Edwards 
DoLius Ensley 

C. H. Ferguson 

B. H. Garner 
J. H. Gilbert 
W. H. Griffin 

C. H. Hester 
R. A. Jones 
M. W. Lanier 
A. S. Lee 

L. C. Leftwich 
J. T. Lovvorn 
Rupert Lowery 

H. S. McMlLLON 
J. J. MiLFORD 

H. T. Mills 
Vaux Owen 
Earl Parker 



J. E. Parsons 
H. A. Powell 
Guy Ray 

A. H. Reid 
Robert Robinson 
Owen Swindall 
T. E. Steely 

J. D. Thompson 

B. H. Walker 
H. S. Wallace 
J. P. Wallace 
A. B. Zbinden 



(103) 



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The College Girls 



Who wouldn't praise them? I think it right 
To laud their virtues. — these angels of light 
Who came to cheer us when clouds were low, 
Bringing us sunshine, dispelling our woe. 



Their souls are crystal, their hearts are gold; 
Their minds are brilliants, — made so to betray 
The beauties of heaven. They're fairer than day. 
Purer than truth, than the sun's bright ray. 



Like Rowers in bloom when springtime is near. 
As the songs of the birds so pleasant to hear. 
As musical waters which ripple in glee. 
Humming sweet melody on their way to the sea. 



As beauty departed, as scenes that have been. 
As sweet to remember as a lover's bright dream. 
There is nothing so beautiful as these diamonds and pearls, 
So 1 speak the praise of the sweet college girls. 

— W. T. TennanI, Jr. 



(104) 




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(105) 



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1914: I0NTRE Nous 




(106) 



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Shelburne Literary Society 



Founded 1913. 
Colors : Violet and Lilac. 

Roll 

Menona Alford 
Geraldine Armstrong 
Fay Barnhart 
Lois Hendricks 
Mrs. J. C. HocKETT 
Lucy Jones 
Olivia Massey 
LuLA Mehaffey 
Louise McCoy 
Mary Swindall 
Miriam Tyler 



(107) 



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(108) 



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Young Men's Christian Association 



Officers 

Ira Fred Simmons President 

Ben Ellis Dunaway Vice-President 

W. W. Adams Emorv Berkstresser Secretary W. H. Griffin 

H. A. Adams Pearson G. Compton , Treasurer W. R. Griffin 

C. D. Boozer G. M. Harris 

. W. BouLDiN Roll E- W. Holmes 

F. A. Bell C. L. Harlan 

T. A. Blake S. S. Howell 

G. C. Chance W. W. Jorden 

L. B.Cranford R. a. Jones 

C. Cunningham E. L. Ford 

W. W. Chandler H. McMillan 

O. S. Causey H. E. Mason 

P. G. Compton C. H. Hester 

V. E. Downey J. F. McRae 

B. E. Dunnaway George Pappas 

J. E. Dunaway J. D. Pickens 

W. T. Edwards H. A. Powell 

J. I. Freeman J. E. Parson 

Emory Berkstresser 

W. D. Blackwelder 

D. L. Blackwelder 

T. H. Robertson 

Robert Robinson 

I. F. Simmons 

S. A. Taylor 

J. D. Thompson 

J. P. Thornberry 

J . T. S YRI NC 

R. K. Vann 
Leake Vice 
W. B. Woodall 
B. H. Walker 
H. A. Wallace 
Ward Yeager 
A. H. Re ID 
E. C. Shaw 
J. A. Ward 



(109) 



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¥(f])LMNTB©R 



(110) 



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DOJ 



1. F. Simmons Leader 

E. Berkstresser Secretary ami Treasurer 

Members 

F. A. Bell W. W. Chandler 
E. Berkstresser D. C. Mason 

T. A. Blake I. F. Simmons 

G. W. BouLDiN J. D. Thompson 



(III) 

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Ministerial Class 



C. Abernathy 
W. W. Adams 
F. A. Bell 

E. Berkstresser 
M. W. Lanier 
C. D. Boozer 

G. W. BOULDIN 
J. D. BURSON 

W. H. Carson 

W. W. Chandler 
C. C. Chance 



J. L. P. Cook 
L. B. Cranford 
C. Cunningham 

L. W. DOCKERY 

W. T. Edwards 

D. Ensley 
C. Ellis 
J. H. Gilbert 
W. H. Griffin 
C. H. Hester 
W. Holmes 



J. W. Southerland 

V. C. Kincaid 
W. D. Blackwelder 



J. A. Huff 
A. S. Lee 
G. P. Ledyard 
H. S. McMillan 
D. C. Mason 
J. J. Milford 
E. Parker 
J. D. Pickens 
A. H. Reid 
T. H. Robertson 
I. F. Simmons 



T. E. Steeley 
S. A. Taylor 
J. D. Thompson 
S. A. Thompson 
J. P. Thornberry 

J. P. Wallace 
V. H. Watson 
R. L. Wyatt 
T. C. Wyatt 
A. B. Zbinden 
J. T. Lovorn 



(113) 

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(114) 




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Gl 


ee 


Club 










Officers 






RiENZi Thomas . 








Director 














President 


Prof. J. C. Hockett 






_5 


ecrclary and Treasurer 




First Tenors 








Second Tenors 




W. W. Adams 








W. H. Carson 




F. A. Bell 








Vaux Owens 




D. L. Blackwelder 








David Gibson 




G. P. Ledyard 








J. F. McRae 




E. Berkstresser 








J. R. Robertson 

W. G. Jackson 

W. T. Edwards 

C. M. Gary 




First Bass 








ScoND Bass 




J. C. Hockett 








E. W. Holmes 




G. W. BOULDIN 








H. A. Adams 




H. S. Wallace 








1. F. Simmons 




W. WOOTEN 








A. H. Reid 





(115) 



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Garner and Company Improvement Association 

B. H. Garner President and General Manager 

"Soggy" Blackshear Foreman 

"Louise" SyrINC Assistant Foreman 

Watson Walker Teamster 

Crew 

Gibson 

Adams 

Powell 
Bell 

Dawson 

Jackson 

Wallace 
Newton 



(116) 




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(117) 



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NTRE Nous 




Medico Club 



Motto: "You may run around for a little while, but we'll get you in the end. 



Officers 

J. A. Ward President 

B. H. Garner Vice President 

W. T. Tennant, Jr. . . . Secretar'y and Treasurer 



Yell 

Yell, yell, yell like hell 

M-E-D-I-C-A-L 

Quinine, strychnine, blood and pus. 

What the devil is the matter with us? 

Nothing, nothing, hold your reins 

Were the guys who fix your pains. 

Roll 



B. H. Garner 

C. B. KiNGRY 

G. C. USSERY 

R. S. Ward 
J. A. Ward 

H. E. Mason 

I. E. Bagwell 

W. T. Tennant, Jr. 
J. E. Dunaway 
C. M. Gary 



O. S. Caused 

C. K. Gilder 

I. F. Simmons 

Robert Robinson 
T. A. Blake 

W. C. TiSDALE 

P. G. Compton 

G. E. Newton 
C. E. Ramsey 
Ira Dunsmore 



Janitor Green — "Stiff" 



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Red Club 

Object : To shine. 
Bradley 
Ramsey 
Ford 

Robinson 

Miss Fay Barn hart 

Christmas Bachelor's Club 

"Slick" Tisdale Coo^ 

"Crook" Garner Housekeeper 

"Soggy" Blackshear Purchasing Agent 

"Big" Taylor Consumer 

"Cutey" Dunsmore Free Boarder 

"Sallie" Thornberry Chaplain 



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Underwood Club 



Tennant 


Lambreth 


Harlan 


Bradley 


USSERY 


W. R. Griffin 


Acton 


Freeman 


Ramsey 


J. R. Robertson 


R. E. Duke 


J. E. DUNAWAY 


Taylor 


Causey 


Parker 


Boozer 


COMPTON 


Robinson 


SORRELL 


W. H. Griffin 



Hobson Club 



Gilder 


Evans 


Ferguson 


R. S. Ward 


DUNSMORE 


Bagwell 


TiSDALE 


J. A. Ward 


Harlan 


Newton 


McRae 


Pickens 


Walker 


Bell 


Davie 


T. A. Blake 


Dawson 


Cranford 


Watson 


Hester 


Reid 


Davis 


Shaw 


Owens 


Vice 


Collins 


Walker 


COLLEY 


McMillan 


WOODALL 


Garner 


Downey 


W. D. Blackwelder 


Abernatiiy 


B. E. Dunaway 


Ledyard 


D. L. Blackwelder 


Jones 


Berkstresser 


Adams 


Thornberry 


Chance 


Blackshear 


Simmons 


Wallace 






Pappas 



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B. L. NoojiN 

COACH 



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Athletic Association 



Officers 

1. F. Simmons President 

R. S. XX'ard Vice-Prciidenl 

B. L. NoojIN Secreiar)) and Treasurer 

ATHLETIC COUNCIL 



I. F. Si 


mmons 


W. A 


Berry 


R. Robinson 


B. L. 


NoojiN 


W. D. Blackwelder 


Wallace 




Leftwich 


Lee Blackwelder 


Edwards 




B. H. Walker 


Davie 


Parker 




Powell 


McRae 


Newman 




J. R. Robertson 


Berkstresser 


Collins 




T. W. Walker 


Syrinc 


Dunsmore 




Gallant 


Cranford 


Lambert 




L. Dawson 


Williams 


Hasty 




King 


B. E. Dunaway 


Ray 




Thornberry 


J. E. Dunaway 


Carmack 




Causey 


Self 


Ensley 




Holmes 


SOUTHERLAND 


Bradley 




Carson 


Blackshear 


Jones 




Tennant 


Newman 


R. E. Duke 




Newton 


Allen 


Acton 




Kincry 


Bell 


Hester 




Thompson 


Abernathy 


Mason 




J. Norman 


Harlan 


Yeacer 




Parsons 


BOULDIN 


Griffin 




McPhaul 


Ford 


B. Norman 




Lowery 


Gibson 


Parsons 




Dockery 


Chance 


Chandler 




Gilmore 


McMillan 


Reid 




Edwards 


Gary 


Vice 




Owens 


R. S. Ward 


Garner 




Bagwell 


J. A. Ward 


Crow 




Lewis 


Lowery 


Rich 




Vann 


Simmons 


Gilder 




Ramsey 


T. A. Blake 


DURAN 




Watson 


Sorrell 


Robinson 




Ussery 


Downey 


Boozer 




A. D. Carlysle 



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A Review of Football for ] 9 ] 3 




HE season of 1913 was one of the most successful in the history of the 
college. Most of last year's Varsity team was back this year in good con- 
dition, and showed a spirit to fight from the start. 

Coach Noojin was on hand at the beginning, and school '.vas scarcely 
open before he had a big bunch of huskies on the field ready for work. 
We should consider ourselves fortunate in having him with us, for he ranks 
among the best coaches of the South. 

Under his management the athletic spirit of the college has at last 
awakened to the fact that it is only a few years before Howard will have a football 
team which will compete with the other colleges of the South. He has put athletics 
on such a firm basis that everybody is interested, and it will not be many years betore 
Howard will be to the South what Colgate is to the East. 

Coach Noojin's ability can be best shown by the way he got together a team for 
the first game. With only about three weeks before the first game he rounded up a 
team that made the " 1 hin Red Line" of Alabama open their eyes and take notice. 

Although the game with Alabama resulted in a defeat for us, we won the name 
of being a bunch of fighters and clean football players. Alabam.a scored in the first 
part of the game, but the "Fighting Baptists" never stopped playing until the whistle 
was sounded for the end of the game. This game seemed to awaken the spirit of the 
team, and they fought with a determination to win the whole season through, even if 
they were fighting against what seemed to be a losing proposition. 

After the Alabama game came the following games: Mississippi A. & M., Jack- 
sonville Normal College, Albertville, Alabama Presbyterian College, Florence Normal 
College, Blcuntville, Birmingham College, and Mississippi College. The games \\ith 
Mississippi A. & M. and Mississippi College resulted in defeats for us, while the game 
with Jacksonville College resulted in a tie. The remainder of the games were \ictories 
for us, some of which were the hardest fought of the season. 

Revenge is sweet, and sweetest of all was our revenge when we defeated Birming- 
ham College. Every player went into the game with vengeance in his heart, and was 
determined to reap it, no matter how dear the cost might be. A determination backed 
by never-ceasing fight was more than Birmingham College could stand, and \vhen the 
game ended the score was 31 to in favor of the "Fighting Baptists." 

A retrospective glance over the past season will show us that Howard had one 
of the best teams in her history, and one that we should all be proud of. 1 he team was 



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a litllc stronger on the defense than odense, this being due to a lack of weight. But 
when it comes to the working of the forward pass Coach Noojin brought forth a 
machine that could do this to perfection. 

The team taken as a whole was composed of clean, honest, conscientious, and 
hard-fighting football players. Robinson, the captain, played a good game the entire 
year, and \sas a good ground gainer. He did stellar work on the defense, and was 
one of the surest tacklcrs on our team. Fullington, Blackwelder, Glass, and Tisdale 
did fine work in the backfield. Duke on right end played star ball all year, especially 
on the defense. Taylor, Acton, Rich, Walker, and Causey in the line played good 
bail also. Garner, at right tackle, was invincible on the defense and one of the best 
men in the line. 

Prospects for next year are exceedingly bright, for nearly all the Varsity will be 
back, and it will be well for you to watch Howard another year. 




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Members of 1913 Varsity Football Team 



B. L. NoOJlN, Coach 

O. S. Causey Manager and Left Tackle 

Robert Robinson Captain and Quarter-Back 

R. E. Duke Right End 

S. A. Taylor Left Guard 

R. G. Rich Center 

B. H. Walker Right End 

B. H. Garner Right Tackle 

J. A. Acton Left End 

E. B. Fullincton Full Back 

D. L. Blackwelder .... Right Half Back 

W. C. Tisdale Left Half Back 

L. McPhaul Sub. Center 

P. G. COMPTON Sub. Tackle 

E. L. Ford Sub. Tackle 

C. King Sub. End 

R. C. Balkcom Sub End 

A. L. Dawson Sub Half Back 

Clay Shaw Sub End 



SCHEDULE FOR 1913 



Howard 

Howard 

Howard 

Howard 14 

Howard 14 

Howard 25 

Howard 65 

Howard 31 

Howard 6 



University of Alabama 27 

Mississippi A. & M 66 

Jacksonville 

Albertville 3 

Anniston 6 

Florence Normal 6 

Blountsville 3 

Birmingham College 

Mississippi College 10 



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J. C. HocKETT, Coach 

SCRUB FOOTBALL TEAM 



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Scrub Football Team 



Officers 



J. C. HOCKETT Coach 

1. F. Simmons Manager 

Members 

Gallant Captain and Left Half 

Watson Full Back 

GlLMORE Right Half 

Allen Quarter Back 

Jenkins Right End 

Adams Right Tackle 

Jordan Left Tackle 

Yeacer Center 

Downey . Left Guard 

Syrinc Right Guard 

Newman Left End 

Griffin Substitute 

UsSERY Substitute 

Carlisle . . Substitute 



Schedule 

Scrubs 21 Ensley High School 20 

Scrubs Birmingham High School 6 

Scrubs 7 Bessemer High School 

Scrubs 15 Gadsden Picked Team 

Scrubs 31 Gadsden Picked Team 6 

Scrubs 27 Ensley High School 6 

Scrubs 13 Bessemer High School 12 

Scrubs 25 Tuscaloosa High School 6 

Scrubs 20 Shelby County High School 31 



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Cta-cX team 



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"^"^ TKACK --^o'^" 



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Track Team 

B. L. NoojlN Coach 

M. C. Newman Manager 

C. B. KiNCRY Captain 

Fred Gallant R. G. Rich E. L. Vice I. F. Simmons 

Vercil Roach J. A. Acton G. I. Dunsmore W. C. Tisdale 

TRACK MEET 

100 yds Gallant 10 1-5 sec. 

220 yds Acton 23 sec. 

440 yds KiNGRY 53 4-5 sec. 

880 yds KiNCRY 2 min. 4 4-5 sec. 

I mile Gal'.ant 4 min. 56 sec. 

High jump Tisdale 5 ft. 6 in. 

Broad jump TiSDALE 20 f I. 

Shol put , Ro \CH 35 f L 

Discus Ro.vch 96 fi. 



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Baseball 




N giving the history of our athletics during the past year we must no[ 
overlook our baseball team, for it was, perhaps, the best that ever repre- 
sented Howard College. Of twenty-four games played, twenty were on 
the victory end of the column, and of the four defeats, two were at the 
hands of professional teams. 

In Watters and Tisdale we had what we believe to be the best battery 
in Southern college baseball. This was always a wmning combmation. 
Then at third base Coach Noojin showed his ability as coach. At the 
beginning of the season this corner of the diamond was one of deepest concern to him, 
for he had no one who could play that position. He went to work, however, and long 
before the end of the season Lee Blackwelder was considered a star, both in the field 
and at the bat. The whole infield, consisting of Robinson, first base; Griffin, second 
base; Goodwin, short stop; and Blackwelder, third base, were very fast and accurate 
fielders; while at the bat they could usually be depended upon. 

The outfield was well taken care of by Dunning, Newman, and Gilder. They 
were very fast, heady players and caused their opponents much anxiety while at the bat. 

There is no reason why the present year should not be a successful one, for we 
have all the old Varsity team back, with the exception of Watters, Dunning, and 
Goodwin. Of course these men will be greatly missed, but Coach Noojin will be on 
the job and have some one to take their places. 

With Tisdale behind the bat, Robinson on first. Griffin at second, and Blackwelder 
at third, and Allen, a new recruit, at short, we should hit our old stride and end the 
season with another long list of victories to our credit. 



Medical College 6 

Southern University I 8 

Southern University 5 6 

Southern University 5 8 

Medical College 3 6 

Medical College 10 11 

Medical College 6 15 

St. Bernard 4 7 

Si. Bernard 11 6 

St. Bernard 5 4 

Blountsville 6 21 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE 
Howard 

14 Blountsville . 





Blountsville 4 

Anniston Preps 4 

Anniiton Preps 2 

Anniston Professionals 9 

Birmingham College 1 

Birmingham College 4 

Birmingham College 

Albertville 

Albertville 8 

Albertville 4 



Howard 

1 

3 
16 

6 

4 
10 
16 
12 
21 

7 

9 



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ennis 









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ORE interest has been taken in tennis this year at Howard than ever before. 
During February a tournament was held between fourteen teams, each 
team playmg thirteen sets. Those teams finishing with a percentage of 
over 500 participated in a second tournament. "Red" Robinson and 
Joe Duke were the winners of this second contest and were declared the 
doubles champions of the college. In a singles contest Garnett Harris 
was the winner. 

On March 9th our doubles and singles teams played a match with 
Birmingham College on our courts and walked away with them in good fashion. The 
score in the doubles was 6-2 and 6-1 and in the singles 6-4 and 6-3. The next day 
the scene was changed to the Birmingham courts and the performance of the previous 
day almost duplicated, the score in doubles being 6-3 and 6-4; singles, 6-2 and 6-4. 
In every set Howard clearly outclassed the Birmingham College team. 

There are four good courts on the campus and every opportunity is given the 
tennis enthusiast to follow his inclination. Sometimes the scene is enlivened by the 
participation of some of the young ladies of East Lake, who favor us with their 
presence, and of late the co-eds have taken quite a fancy to this nimble pastime. 



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State Oratorical Contest 




g. i. dunsmore 
Howard's representative 



Miss Franxis Macon 

SPONSOR 



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Arbor Day at Howard 




UR alumni and friends who have visited us this year have observed a 
change in the Howard spirit. One cause of this change is not far to 
seek. It is the close attention to details on the part of those in authority 
in all those activities which are believed to make for a richer and 
stronger college life and training. While preparing for the future we 
are living as fully as we can in the present. One example of this practical 
interest in the "little things" was the inauguration on February 16 of an 
annual celebration of Arbor Day. 
The exercises themselves were brief and simple. Prof. Dawson, who presided, 
showed that the purpose of the exercise was in line with that of the public schools in 
their celebration of Arbor Day — viz., to educate young people as to the aesthetic value 
of our trees and forests and to lead pupils to so admire and love our common trees 
that they will become practical arborists. Dr. Shelbourne read a series of impressive 
verses from the Bible, which were repeated after him by those present. Then came a 
series of readings by the representatives of the "Co-eds," the High School, and the 
four college classes, respectively. Among these were Irving'? "He Who Plants an 
Oak," Lanier's "A Ballad of Trees and the Master," and the first part of Bryant's 
"Forest Hymn." The assembly then proceeded from the south end of the main 
building, where the more formal part of the exercises was held, to the campus in 
front, and the six trees were planted in succession, each of the classes, the young ladies 
and the High School students respectively reading in unison an appropriate piece of 
poetry as its representative threw the first shovelfuls of earth. 

A most pleasing feature of the occasion was the spirit of unity exhibited — the co- 
operation on the part of faculty and student body in working toward a common end. 
This spirit, as shown at this and at other times, is one of the things which makes us 
feel "like we are somebody," as Dr. Shelbourne sometimes expresses it. 



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Results of Election Held By "Entre Nous'' 



Most Popular Man SiMMONS 

Most Popular Co-ed *Olivia Massey and LouiSE McCov 

Best Foolball Player TrsDALE 

Best Baseball Player TiSDALE 

Best Tennis Player Harris 

Best Track Man GaLLANT 

Best- All-round Athlete TiSDALE 

Best Student BoULDlN 

Best All-round Man Robinson 

Best Preacher HuFF 

Best Orator DuNSMORE 

Best Debater DuNSMORE 

Best Natured Man LouiS DaWSON 

Best Natured Co-ed Olivia Massey 

Most Cynical Man "BiC Bud" Wyatt 

Most Cynical Co-ed LouiSE McCoY 

Best Room Keepers DuNAWAY Bros. 

Poorest Room Keepers Bagwell 

Biggest Tobacco Bum BlacksheaR 

Biggest Sport "RuBE" ROBERTSON 

Biggest Liar LeDYARD 

Biggest Bore *Th0RNBERRY and WyaTT 

Biggest Ladies' Man ROBERTSON 

Biggest Flirt Du.vSMORE 

Most "Sissy" Man B. E. DuNAWAY 

Most Conceited Man WyaTT 

Most Conceited Co-ed LouiSE McCoY 

Most Handsome Man Davie 

Prettiest Co-ed MiSS McCoY 

Busiest Man Simmons 

Laziest Man Harlan 

Ugliest Man Ford 

Co-ed Tantalizer JoE DuKE 

Most Frequent Visitor to the President's Office .... Newton 

Possessor of Most Stalely Pompadour KiNCRY 

Poorest Excuse for a Pompadour Self 

Biggest Loafer at Station BlacksheaR 

Biggest Loafer at Town Van and SoRRELL 

Most Popular Professor Macon 

•Tie. 



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" ] 9 1 4 Chestnuts," By Dunsmore 




EWTON was continually coming in Prof. Burns' classroom behind time. 
One day he was later than usual, and after the class he went up to 
apologize. 

"Professor," said he, "My watch is fifteen minutes behind time and 
has worried me a great deal lately, but after this I shall put no more 
faith in it." 

"It is not faith you want in it," said Prof. Burns; "it's works." 



* ¥ ¥ 

Wanted — To know what Co-ed's mother made this remark: "Daughter, what 
time did that Howard sport leave last night? " 
Daughter: "I do not know, mother." 
Little brother: "I know; it was one o'clock. " 
Mother: "How do you know?" 
Little brother: "Well, I heard him say, 'Just one, just one.' 

"One hair on the head is worth six in the comb." — Compton. 

* ¥ * 

Burmah: "And would you really put yourself out for me?" 

Bowden: "Indeed I would." 

Burmah: " I hen do it, please; I'm awfully sleepy." 



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Wanted — Some one to keep the ladies from worrying me to death. — Ford. 

Doctor: "I don't hke your heart action; you've had some trouble with angina 
pectoris." 

Joe Duke: "^'ou are partly right; but that is not her name." 

:f, }{, s^ 

Prof. Moon: "How was Caesar killed? " 
Miss McCoy: "He was stabbed in the Senate." 

Robertson says he doesn't wonder that Miss Barnhart is afaird of lightning — she's 
so awfully attractive, don't you know. 

All of which reminds us: CAN THE MOON TURN GRAY? 
Joe Duke and Fred Simmons are "Keene" rivals, so they say. 

A Little Story of Names. 

One day the Duke went sailing down the Jordan and passed the Old Mills when 
he noticed the Rich man driving his Ford with the Parscrts, who had been Srvindal'd 
out of their Holmes by their Vice Tennant. The King met the Duke at the Milford 
and recommended to him a NeTvman, who would not Steele if given a Chance. Where- 
upon the Dul(e asked the King if the Neivman was a Freeman any Moore, Orr had 
he DunaTVav with his Gallant Cool( and Mason. 

Oh Sharv! It is Useless to continue. (See next Annual.) 

Wanted — To know how many cows and tons of grits Howard students eat in a 
session. • ^JFI 

Wanted — To know what beauty parlor Ford attended. — Bod Tate. 

Wanted — To know what "Big" Taylor said in the football game at Jackson, 
Miss. — Ministerial Board. 

Wanted — To know how long "Runt " Gallant is going to be a prep. — Carson. 

Wanted — To know who put the "Slats " to Wallace. — "Croof(" Garner el al. 

Prof. Dawson "A fool can ask questions a wise man cannot answer." 
Norman: "That's why we all flunked." 



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R. L. Tate, Presidenl W. C. TiSDALE, Secretary 

Capital, $1.98. Surplus, $.87. 

OFFICE OF 

TATE & TISDALE, Inc. 

DEALERS IN CHINA-BERRY BEADS, RAZORS, HOSIERY, AND NOVELTIES 

OF ALL KINDS 
Office: Fourth Floor Hunt's Hall. Office Hours: 8:00 to 5:00 

East Lake, Alabama 
Suffragettes— 8:00 to 9:00. 
Book Agents— 9:00 to 10:00. 

People with funny ideas (Howard Professors) — 10:00 to 11:00. 
Ladies With Tickets for Sale— I I :00 to 12:00. 
Lunch (at Jerry's) — 12:00 to I :00. 
Figuring interest on what we owe — 1 :00 to 2:00. 
Old Maids Seeking Matrimony — 2:00 to 3:00. 
Pawnbrokers and Burglars — 3:00 to 4:00. 
Miscellaneous Calls — 4:00 to 5:00. 

Appointments can be made any hour of the night by calling Main 78 1 3 YZ. 
Agents Wanted — No Howard student need apply. 

"Do you love me?" said the paper bag to the sugar. 
"I'm simply wrapped up m you, " replied the sugar. 
"You sweet thing, " murmured the paper bag. — Ex. 

It would be best not to speak of examinations. We will pass them by with bowed 
heads. We passed them with "Jacks" before. Freshmen will please commit the following 
— it is your yearly routine: 

Matriculation, 
Recitation, 

Examination, 

Consternation, 

Lamentation, 

No Salvation, 

Damnation! 

On Probation. 



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The Skeeter and Peter. 
There was a young fellow named Peter 
Who swiped at an active young skeeter. 
But the skeeter struck first 
And quenched his thirst. 
For the skeeter was fleeter than Peter. 
(Apologies to all the Newspaper Poets). 

Prof. Haggard "Caesar went into Gaul with — " 

Webb Jordan: "Aw, Professor, let's don't talk about Caesar, let's talk about 
Santa Claus." 

The baseball team is contemplating a Northern tour. They will probably take in 
Cullman. The Cops will probably take them in. 

Coach Noojin: "What kind of aid does a blind man get when he clutches a straw?" 
Causey: "Give it up." 
Coach: "Lemonade. " 

Prof. Dawson: "Dunsmore, are you thinking or guessing?" 
Dunsmore: "I guess I'm thinking." 

Prof. Olive: "A body when charged is electrified. Give an example. " 
Tisdale: "Dean Blackwelder's new suit." 

Some one said that when Glass blushes he looks like a stained window. Glass says 
it's pane-ful to blush. (Please use an automobile hearse this time). 

Bell rung the Bell when he admonished "Crip" Tennant for not blowing out 
"Tubby" Bolen's cigar lighter when he got through with it. 

Miss Alford is undecided whether she will be a Duchess or a Queen — as she goes 
with both a Duke and a King-ry. C? 

If you want to get rid of old syrup, give Ledyard a quarter and he will drink it up. 



(156) 




±^±4: Qntre Nous 




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(157) 



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i^±4 flNTRE Nous 

liiiilillll! 



A Taste of Tennant's Poetry. 
I stood on the bridge at midnight. 

And the clock was striking the hour; 
The hour rose up indignant. 

And struck back with all its power. 
(There was only one thing that saved him and that was his "gasoline engine"). 



Prof. Olive (in Physics) : "Now if I should drop my head forward and remain 

perfectly still, you should say I was a clod. But if I move — then what?" 
A Voice: "Clodhopper." 
Class dismissed. 

Speaking of cigar lighters, if ye will allow ye ed to gratulate, he will tell you what 
to do when you have nothing to light your cigar with. Just take one out of the box and 
make the box a cigar lighter. (No, I thank you, I've quit smoking). 



Miss Massey: "Mr. Tisdale, I saw some one the other day who said they knew 
you, but I didn't hardly believe it." 
"Slick": "Who was it?" 
Miss Massey: "Myrtis Wright." 
"Slick": "Huh!" 

"Soggy" Blackshear should be prosecuted for extortion. He asked "Boss" Garner 
to advance him a dime on his salary for fixing the walks. (Save yourself for the next 
joke, please). 



Motto of Ye Rats: 



'I'm cured." 

Oh! faculty, faculty, fuss. 

What in the world is the matter with us? 

We cram and jam 

For your Exams 

But we do sometimes "bust ". 



(158) 




NTRE Nous 

IIHiiiH 



Speaking of the "Keeley Cure," we now have the Keeley cure — Engagements for 
dinner at Mrs. Keene's. 



What Eugene Dunaway says in his sleep: "Transfer to Norwood, please." 



A certain Math, student wishing to "shag" Prof. Eagles, presented him with a 
rabbit caught during the snow. While said Prof, was attending chapel, some kind friend 
relieved him of the care of Brer Rabbit. Now, Prof. Eagles wants to know who got his 
hare (h-a-i-r). We do not claim to be a Joel Chandler Harris nor a Sherlock Holmes, 
but it occurs to us that old Brer Dandruff may have had a hand in it. 



Once there was a Prez named "Jimmy" 
In size not so tall nor skinny 

And grey hair he had galore. 
Now this Prez got it into his head 
That Howard must be Co-ed. 

And this idea, we must admit, we do adore. 
But what IS bothering us 
Is this Prez raises a fuss 

When the Co-eds mix too much with the boys. 
But, to be just. 
We guess we just must 

With the Co-eds raise very little noise. 



Prof. Burns: "What was Lady MacBeth doing in act (?), scene (?) ?' 
"Rube" Robertson: "Cleaning MacBeth's clothes." 
Prof. Burns: "How do you get that?" 
"Rube": "She says, 'out, out, damned spot." 



The Lover's Barometer 
If she loves you, the weather's fine, but oh, my! if she don't! ! ? ? 



(159) 




i^±4 [0NTRE Nous 



If Prof. Dawson's German Students E\er Get to Gi\e Him a Lesson! 
"Now, after reading half a dozen books of parallel for tomorrow, and going to the 
library and looking up all references in the notes, you may begin at the first lesson and 
write this book of English into German script, with a three thousand word thesis on the 
author, and remember, if you mispronounce a single German word you cannot possibly 
get your diploma. And remember, too, this lesson must be gotten up by supper time 
tonight, or you cannot get any credit for your past work." 

(Excusez-nous, s'il vous plait, Mr. Goldberg, we didn't mean to infringe). 



Parody on Spartacus to the Roman Gladiators 

BY ROBERT LEE TATE. 

Ye call me chief! And ye do well to call me chief, who for four long years have 
met m Professors Moon and Hendricks class rooms, every form of Latin and History 
the Board of Trustees of Howard College could force upon me, and who has never given 
us hope. If there be any Prep, among you who can say that in either place I failed 
to "bluff through" let him stand forth and say it. If there be any Freshman or Sophomore 
who dares, let him come on. And yet I was not always thus a dignified Senior. My 
ancestors came from Pratt City, and settled upon the dark and blue Village Creek. My 
life ran as quiet as the creek, and when at noon I gathered the mules beneath the shade, 
and played upon my French harp, there was a Howard boy who partook of the same 
rustic meal. 

One evening while my Howard friend and I were sitting in our room, another 
Howard boy told us how a little band of Preps, and Rats in years gone by had with- 
stood the whole student body. I did not know what hazing was then, but my cheeks 
burned and my room-mate bade me go to bed and think no more of savage hazing and 
ratting. That very night the Ratters landed in my room. I saw my room-mate tied and 
whipped. To-day, I whipped a man on the campus, and when I got up, behold he was 
my friend. 

And so, fellow students, must you and so must I, "flunk" like men. O Howard! 
Howard, thou hast been a tender nurse to the innocent Freshman, who has never had a 
harder lesson than drawing and writing. Thou hast given me a mind of leather and 
asbestos. Thou hast taught me to invent and "bluff" as quickly as called upon. 

Hark! hear ye that sound roaring in the class room? Tis six weeks since the Pro- 
fessor failed you, but to-morrow he shall break his fast upon you, and a pretty soft 
thing ye will be. 

If ye are Preps then stand here like "mutton-heads" waiting for the Professors' 
exams! If ye are men follow me, and gain a pass by doing good work. Is Howard 
dead? Is the Howard spirit frozen in your veins? O Juniors! O Seniors! if we must 
fight let us fight our Professors; if we must slaughter, let us slaughter our exams. Seize 
your diplomas; go out into the world and forget Latin and History, as have done your 
predecessors. 

(160) 

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(161) 

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ill 




1^14 flNTRE Nous 



m 



"Daises Won't Tell" 




E loves me, he loves me not, he loves me, he loves me not ! There, that 
makes three times it has come out like this! Betsie said the daisies told 
the truth; it must be so, but I don't believe it." 

Beatrice, who stood in the field of waving white daisies, stamped her 
foot impatiently. 

"It just can't be true," but there was a merry twinkle in her eyes as 
she spoke to the daisies. 

"I guess you are just fooling me! Well, I don't mind, when I 
look mto his eyes I see something there, and I know it's love! Oh, daisies!" She fell 
on her knees and threw her arms around a great bunch of the nodding blossoms. 
"Daisies, I love him. I love him, but he shan't know. You are the only things I can 
talk to; you won't tell, will you, because daisies won't tell? " 

Her hat had fallen back and the wind was caressing her curly hair. She was 
about to gather some of her treasures when she saw a figure approaching in the distance. 
Her eyes widened with surprise. "Why, I didn't tell him where I'd be. Well, I 
wonder if he has seen me? Yes — no — I'll run — -that's all there is left to do, unless 
I stay here and talk it out. Oh, my!" She ran through the daisies leaving them 
parted. What an excellent path for the man who pursued ! 

Beatrice did not think of this; nor did she until she reached a large grove of 
trees not far from her home. "Now what shall I do? Here he comes. He has seen 
me. I might have known it. Well, I've gotten this far and I wouldn't talk to him 
now for anything. My! how hot it is, and how soiled my dress is! What if he heard 
what I said to those daisies. Oh, of course he couldn't; he was too far away, but what 
shall I do?" 

Beatrice was a pretty picture standing among the trees, the wind blowing her 
hair this way and that, amusement in her eyes, and in her hand a daisy with petals flying. 
Nearer and nearer came the man. On the impulse of the moment the girl climbed a 
tree near at hand, the branches of which were close together. She laughed gleefully 
and, leaning back comfortably, she began to muse aloud. "Goody, I'm safe. My! 
but he'll be mad. He will go straight home and when daddy tells him I'm not there, 
won't he be shocked? Gracious!" 

By this time John had reached the grove, and for once in his life he was un- 
welcome. He was a tall, handsome man, and over his left arm was hung a large 
straw hat covered with a wreath of daisies. The girl, from her safe distance, shud- 



(162) 




1^14 



Hntre Nous 



dered. She had left her hat behind her! "Crickety!" she murmured, "what if he 
stays here? I wish he'd leave my hat. The sun is hot! Oh, please go home, John," 
she whispered. 

The man quickly reached the end of the road; then he looked up and down it long 
and carefully. An amazed and disappointed look came into his eyes. "Why, she 
couldn't be far away. I've followed her right up. She'd be in sight somewhere." 
The man turned his back to the road and eyed the woods reproachfully. "This beats 
all," accompanied with a groan! He walked about, gazing behind the trunks of the 
large oaks and elms; then suddenly his search ceased. His laugh rang out gaily. He 
was quite overcome by the ridiculous position he was in. "I've got it; she climbed a 
tree. Wonder why I didn't think of that before?" He looked around; this time not 
so doubtfully; then he found her, leaning pleasantly against the trunk, and evidently 
enjoying the situation, since she was shaking with laughter. 

"You come down," he challenged, "and tell me what you ran away for." 

"You go away, man." This teasingly. 

"How long do you expect to stay up there, then, young lady?" 

"All night." 'Twas a composed reply. 

"Then I'll stay, too." He stood there tall and straight, his eyes meeting here 
unfalteringly. 

"Won't you please sit down, John?" this very sweetly. "I fear you'll become 
tired." 

He raised his eyes again to hers. "Listen, little girl! I can't go this time until 
you give me the promise I want. Oh, promise me." 

"What promise? I never make promises. I thought you knew that." 

John ignored her and continued: "Tell me, won't you be my little girl, Beatrice; 
won't you, forever? I thought you knew what I mean; I thought I read the answer 
in your eyes. Tell me, little girl." 

"Oh, John, you dear. I'm daddy's girl. Of course I always will be. Please go." 

"Well, you are a daisy." 

"Oh, thank you. Do you really mean it?" 

He looked up surprised. "Certainly, and why not?" 

"Well, then, since I'm a daisy I can't tell you." 

"And pray, why not?" 
'Cause daisies won't tell." 

He, laughingly: "Do you believe in daisies, too, little sweetheart?" 

"Yes, John, do you?" 

"I did not until a while ago, but when I came through the field just now the wind 
stirred the flowers, and they swayed back and forth like the ebbing tide, and whispered 



(163) 



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i^±4: [^NTRE Nous 



"Sliilillilllll I 



to me such sweet things, girhe, such wonderful promises. And as I hastened through 
after you, I told them of my love for you, and they nodded and smiled, as if to say, 
'Go to her and she will tell you; we can't.' So I came. You won't send me away. 



lear, will you 



y 



His eyes were pleading and not in \ain. During his story she had climbed down 
and now she stood beside him, true love burning in her eyes. Then she looked into 
his eyes and \vhispered: "And the daisies didn't tell you?" 

"No, dear." 

"Well, I'm glad. You see it's nice to be able to tell them things, but there isn't 
any use to ask them questions, 'cause daisies won't tell! " 

And in the twilight he kissed her. 

— Madeline Kcene. 




(164) 




Intre Nous 



Mammy's Philosophy 



42 



ET outer here, Sallie Ann, fo you gits dat yaller ribbon tuk off dat hair 
of yourn. Gocd Lawd, but it sho takes the patience of Job for to make 
a cake, what dem white folks call "Angel Food," but I'm tellin' you de 
truth, honey, dar ain't been nary bit of food what I done put in this heri 
cake angelic. No, sir, dat it haint," ejaculated Mammy as she stood by 
the lone window of her cabin stirring her Sunday cake. 

"Well, bless grashus, ef yonder don't come Liza Jane, and dat jack- 
legged fellow who calls 'Mr. Brown,' but he more black dan he am 
brown. Ain't I done tol' her daddy he wr.rn't no count, and here she come buttin' 
right up here with him again. Just look at that walk uf his, as ef he owned Turkey 
Creek. Now wouldn't Lize Jane's ma put her foot down on dat if she wuz livin'? 
but things nevah happen when day should, specially in the case of matrimony, but ef — " 
"Mammy, Mammy, George William Smith done hit nr.e wid a rock as big as er 
house," screamed Sally Ann, as she came running in, crying all the louder as she 
came nearer Mammy. 

"Nevah mind dat poah white trash, honey, dey don't know whut's right and 
whut ain't. Just you wait till I gits day cake in de stove, and den I'll make you a 
mustard plaster," said Mammy, putting the last cup of flower in the cake. 

"Mornin', Sal, whar's your mammy?" groaned a voice from without. With this 
Mammy jumped, pulled her cap on straight, when a wooly head appeared. This was 
Josh, Liza Jane's father. 

"Mornin', Miss Cindy. How yuh comin' dis mawnin'?" he asked, wiping the perspi- 
ration from his brow with a large, bandanna handkerchief. 

'Pert as a cricket. Josh, but foah de Lord, what am yuh doing lookin' as 
skeered as a rabbit when he hears er gun?" asked Mammy in hurried tones. 

"Now dat am it. I just come fer to tell you. Well, I was way down in my 
cornfield when all at once I heard sich a laff as I thought my time had come. I 
looked up, and bless grashus, d^-r stood Liza Jane and dat Brown fellow saunterin' 
along. I could not believe my eyes. Liza Jane, when she seed me her hopes fell down 
right dar, and I seed her whisper sumpin to de boy, and he up and runs lippity cut, 
lippity cut, down de big road." 

"Well, what did you say to Liza Jane? " 

"Shucks. I tol' her to git in dat house, and den I locked de doah, and here am 
de key, all safe and sound, " said Josh, as he dangled a large, rough key from a red 
string. 



(163) 



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"I'm gwine lo tell yuli wliat to do. Go right home and send dat gal of yourn 
to college, uhut am got a fence around it so high dat she could nebber climb it. And 
don't you be long erbout it either, lease ef you do she sholy will be married to dat 
fellow,' assured Mammy, as Josh started off. 

"Jes fetch her close right up here and I'll darn 'em and help her make new 
ones. I'll fix dat gal up in some style en — " She was still hollering words of advice 
as Josh turned into the lane, but his heart was too heavy and his head too full to hear 
more. He walked slowly, thinking what he would ever say to Liza Jane, and knew 
that he did not want her to go. At last he reached his cabin. 

"Liza Jane, git your close up, I'm gwin to sen' you ter college. Den you can 
I'arn and be smart. I sho is gwme to sen' my chile to college." 

"Oh, Daddy, I'm so glad. Mr. Brown says he likes college girls," exclaimed 
Liza Jane, jumpmg up and down for joy. 

"Mr. Brown, the dickens," thundered Josh, as he stamped his mighty foot. "Don't 
let me heah any moh 'bout day low specimen ob humanity." 

Liza Jane arose quickly, collected her few things, and started toward Mammy's. 
But when she came to the first turn m the road, there stood Mr. Brown. 

"Whar am yo gwme wid dat bundle?" asked Mr. Brown. 

"Just whar I wish as I wusn't," sighed Liza Jane, as she suddenly came to a halt. 

"Den just you kum wid me, honey, en I'll always take good keer uf you. * Mr. 
Brown took the small bundle, and they hurried lo the parson's and were married. That 
day when the news reached Josh he hastened to Mammy's and told her all about it. 

"Well, I don't blame de chilluns when de parents don't do no bettah," said 
Mammy angrily. 

"Parents! Well, she ain't got but one parent, en — " 

"Yeah, but she shorely needs anudder," interrupted Mammy. 

"An', Cindy, dat am you. Just you kum right on ovah heah to de parson's 
wid me, and tonight when dey kum home dey will be just as sprised as dey sposed we 
would be. Yas, dat dey will," laughed Josh, as he waited for Mammy to get her 
bonnet. LucY JONES, '16. 



(166) 

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(167) 



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(168) 



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(171) 

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(172) 



A Fortunate Accident 



HE mail had jusl bcc-n distributed in North Hall al Hollins Col- 
lege. Francis Matthews went back to her room \vith a heart 
more heavy than light. True, she had a good letter from 
Henry, her "Best Bet, " but the letter from sister Jena at home 
told a sad story. Brother Harold, the idol of the fam.ly, had 
lately become quite fascinated with Ellen Jameson, the daughter 
of one of the tenants on the Matthews' plantation. 

"Oh, just listen at this, Mr.bel. Brother has gone and 
fallen in love with that horrid little Ellen Jam;son. \^hy, none of us would 
think of associating with her. Her father is one of the poorest men on father's 
plantation, and they li\e in a little cottage 'way down on the creek. If he 
were to marry this girl, it would disgrace our family, for you know that father 
owns more than three thousand acres of land around Hilton, and I have heard 
a lot of people say that father is one of the largest planters in Mississippi. 




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Just think of Brother taking up with a girl of such low breeding. Why, she 
even works in the field sometimes. He finished at A. & M. last year and 
father had begun to turn all of his affairs over to him, for he's getting old and 
feeble. Such an affair as this will cause father's death, I know. Something 
will have to be done. Jena says that she has talked to Brother about it, but 
it does not seem to do any good. I believe that he would leave her alone 
if there were any really attractive girls in Hilton." 

Mabel was Francis' roommate. This was her first year at Hollins, but 
already she had won a warm place in the hearts of all the girls by her 
courteous consideration for other people and by her ready sympathy for every- 
body. She was a pretty type of blonde and was "just the right size," as some 
of her masculine admirers in Birmingham expressed it. Along with all these 
good qualities she loved adventure in the field of romance and knew all the 
ins and out's of the roping-in process. 

"Francis, dear, Fm mighty sorry to hear about this affair. My brother 
married a poor girl. We were awfully distressed about it and tried our best 
to make him quit her, but he loved her and stuck to her. The girl came out 



wonderfully after he married her, and they are getting along nicely now. 
But I know it doesn't happen that way all the time, and it does not matter 
so much in a city as it does in a small town like Hilton. I like Harold's looks 
and wish I could get a chance at him myself. But father is only a wholesale 
grocer, you know, and I might not suit! " 

"Now, quit your joking, Mabel. You know you are the dearest girl 
in the world to me, and if I could only get Harold to fall in love with you, 
I would be perfectly happy." 

Both girls were silent for a moment. Suddenly Francis' face lighted up. 
"I have a scheme! Dear, I want you to visit me just as soon as school is 
out. I believe that if we work it right, we can break up this affair and that 
Brother will fall in love with you when he has been with you a few days. 
Oh, I know he will !" 

"That sounds good to me. But you know I will have to be at home 
awhile before I could go anywhere, and, of course, I will have to get the 
consent of the homefolks. I'll just be tickled to death if I can go. I'm not 
so sure of catching your brother, but maybe I could keep him from marrying 



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that Jameson girl. She may be a good girl and all that, but I realize what a 
flam it would be on your family, and I am willing to do anything I can to 
help you." 

"I knew you would! You're just the dearest girl in the world, and if 
Brother could only find it out, all would be well. We will have to make our 
plans ull along. And just think, it is just six weeks today before we will 
be leaving here for home. Two weeks ought to be enough for you, and then 
you can come to see us. I guess Jena can keep Brother from buying his 
license during this tinr.e. And that is all we need to do — to gel there before 
he goes loo far. I'll write Jena right now and tell her of our plans, and I 
know she will do her best in the meantime." 

Hollin's Commencement was over and all the girls had gone to their 
homes. Mcbel Conway was filled with the joy of being at home, and was 
taking advantage of the care-free life of a college girl who has been home 
lor only a short while. But, though she saw some of her admirers until 
very late som; nights and rarely made her appearance before nine or ten the 



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1903 Second Ave. 1928 Third Ave. 



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Phone Main 222 
Birmingham, - - Alabama 



Howard College 

in Birmingham, Ala, 

When you are thinking of a college for your son or daughter there 
are at least two questions you will ask: WHERE. IS THE COL- 
LEGE? Howard College is in Birmingham. People like Birming- 
ham. They are coming to Birmingham to live from all parts of the 
State and all parts of our country. 

Your son will like Birmingham. There are so many things to see, 
so many kinds of people. So many great buildings and great industries. 
To be a student and live in the Birmingham district is an unusual privi- 
lege. The boy has his privilege when he does his college work at 
Howard. 

WHAT IS THE COLLEGE? You will also want to know 
what the college is, what kind of an institution it is. Does it really 
educate young men? Do young men receive personal and sympathetic 
attention? Are the teachers competent men, both from point of view 
of scholarship and character? Are proper views of life inculcated and 
is the student helped to understand that there is more to life than meat 
and drink? 

If you will make careful investigation concerning these two inquiries, 
WHERE IS THE COLLEGE? ard WHAT IS THE COL- 
LEGE? you will be pleased with what you find at Howard. 

Howard College High School 

How would it appeal to you to have your son do his high school 
work with men only for teachers, especially if these ?re men of experi- 
ence, and are graduates from colleges and universities? Would you 
like to know that your son is not in over crowded class rooms, and that 
he is being taught with special reference to college work, and not bring- 
ing his educational career to a close in the high school. 

Howard College High School is this kind of a school. It has five 
professors, and limits its students to one hundred. 

B. J. NOOJIN, Principal. 



Judson College 



EstabHshed in 1838. 

Marion, Alabama 



^ A beautiful Carnegie Library, well equipped. 

^ A Gymnasiuir, with suitable apparatus. 

^ Large Athletic Field. 

^ Physical, Chemical and Biological Laboratory. 

^ A good telescope. 

^ A capacious Art Studio with fine outlcolc. 

fj An Auditorium of excellent proportions and large seating capacity. 

^ A splendid memorial Pipe Organ. 

^ Fifty Music Practice Rooms. 

^ A well equipped department of Home Economics, including Domes- 
tic Science and Domestic Arts. 

^ An up-to-date Infirmary under management of Health Officer. 

^ Beautiful and spacious grounds. 

^ An attractively kept Dining Roox. 

^ A Dormitory unusually well adapted to the life of students. 

^ Long Galleries, Wide Halls and High Ceilings, furnishing ideal 
conditions for exercise of students in bad weather. 



For Catalog and other information, addiess 

Paul V. Bomar, D. D. 

Marion, Alabama 



THE BIRMINGHAM 
MEDICAL COLLEGE 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
# 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

^ Open to students of the last or Senior year onl\). Excellent oppor- 
tunities for hospital and clinical work, as well as bedside instruction in 
the Hillman Hospital (200 beds) and the University Free Dispensary. 
As the GRADUATE School of Medicine of the University of Ala- 
bama, the department is open to graduates in Medicine for advanced, 
graduate and research work. 

DENTAL DEPARTMENT 

^ A thorough three-year course is offered, leading to the Degree of 
D.D.S. Excellent facilities for practical instruction and experience in 
the Dental College Free Dispensary. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY AND PHARMA- 
CEUTICAL CHEMISTRY' 

^ Offers courses of two, three and four sessions, leading to the Degrees 
Ph.G., Ph.Ch., B.S. in Phar., and Phar.D. Students may devote 
one-half their time to work in the drug stores of Birmingham while at 
college Unusual opportunities for practical instruction and experience. 
^ For catalogues or information concerning any department, write 

DR. E. P. HOGAN, Secretary 

BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL COLLEGE 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



next morning, she was not entirely unoccupied with real work. With constant 
pleading and using many artful excuses and devices, she had finally gained 
the consent of her parents to make the visit to Francis Matthews' home so soon. 
And she knew that to carry out the scheme of charming Harold Matthews she 
must have a very elaborate wardrobe and all the most up-to-date equipment 
in her line. Great big bills were run up at Loveman's, Caheen's, and Steele- 
Smith's, but her father was indulgent and there was no opposition on this 
score. All hands in the house were put to the task of getting her ready for 
this trip, and everything was in readiness when the day came around for her 
to depart, but only Mabel knew that this trip was something more than the 
ordinary visit. 

The trip to Hollins, Miss., was uneventful for Mabel. The train arrived 
there at 4:10 in the afternoon. Francis and Jena had come down to the 
little station in the family carriage. All Hilton had heard of the coming of 
a visitor to the Matthews family and all who could leave their work for a 
little while were there to get the first look at the lady. As she stepped from 



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Jefferson Coui.ty Savings Bank 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS 
$750,000.00 

Transacts a general banking business. 

C. F. EnslEN, Ch'mn. of Board C. E. ThoMAS. Vke-Prcz. 

E. F. EnslEN, President W. C. SteRRETT. Ca:luer 

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Bank Established 1885. 



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WHOLESALE 

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1891-03 FIRST AVENUE 



BIRVIIVGH.\M, ALABAM K 



the train she was embraced fervently by Mabel and then introduced Lo Jena, 
who repeated the operation. 

"Oh, dear, I'm so glad to see you. You can't imagine how anxiously I 
have looked forward to your coxing. Let's go around to the carriage and 
right home. Brolher had to go down to the plantation this afternoon and 
could not come to meet you. He has been getting more and more crazy about 
that Jameson girl. Every chance he gets he goes to her house and goes 
ftrolling with her down by the creek, and I suspect he is there with her right 
now. Father says he has been neglecting his work, but father doesn't know that 
he is having anything to do with her. We thought it best not to tell him any- 
thing about it. Brother does not know anything about our plans and every- 
thing is arranged for the campaign." 

"Dear, " interrupted Jena, "I'm certainly glad you are here at last, for I 
was afraid that Brother's affair would get too far along before you came. 
He's the craziest thing you ever saw. Ellen Jameson is the type of girl who 
looks beautiful in a calice dress, has bewitching eyes, and Brother is crazy about 
her raven black hair. But I think we can break it up alright, for you are even 



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57 Warren St. 



NEW YORK 



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makers of 

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Birmingham, Ala. 



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ALBANY. NEW YORK 

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Electrical Goods 

Walker-Middlebrook Co. 

313 N. l')th St. Birmingham. Ala. 



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more charming than I had imagined. We have arranged several affairs already, 
and Brother will be with you at each one. I'm sure he will forget that little 
scamp of a girl." 

"Well, I'm right in for the game. I know it is cruel to break up love 
affairs, but I feel that it is justifiable in this case. I'm ready to do my 
best." 

At this juncture the carriage halted at the front gate of a magnificent old 
colonial home sitting back among the trees some distance from the street. The 
girls alighted and were met at the front door by Mrs. Matthews. 

"I've heard Francis speak of you so often since she came home that I 
feel that I have known you for some time. Just feel that you are at home 
from the very first. I am glad you have com; and I know we will all enjoy 
having you with us." 

At supper that night Mabel met Harold and also Mr. Matthews. She 
was very much attracted to Harold at once. He was even more handsome 
than the picture of him that she had £een. She could see very clearly that 
it would be a shame for him to fall in love with a girl of inferior birth. 



J. H. HAHN. W. R. FOREMAN. 

Pres. Treas and Mgr. 

SPIRO ROOFING & 
HEATING COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

SHEET METAL WORK AND 
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240810 Ttiird Ave., N Telephone 195 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 



JAS. WALKER 

Real Estate 

FIRE AND ACCIDENT 
INSURANCE 

101 77th Street Telephone 6 

East Lakr. Ala. 



(Established 1887) 

Collins & Company 

Wholesale Groceries 
and Produce Merchants 

Sole Agents for Snowllake b lour. 

2301 First Ave. 2300 Morris Ave. 
Birmingham. Ala. 



THF 

BIRMINGHAM 

NEWS 

The South' s Greatest Paper 



tliougli his family's welfare be disregarded. He certainly deserved the best 
girl in the country. Harold showed no visible signs of being charmed, although 
he showed Mabel the proper and ordinary attention. 

I hat night there vsas a Ir.wn party at the Matthews' home, to which all 
the best people in Hilton were invited. Quite a large crowd responded, for it 
was a rare honor to ba invited to the Matthews' homa. Mabel was beautiful 
in her crepe de chene over pink satin. She was the most beautiful creature 
that the populace had ever gazed upon in this little town of Hilton. After the 
prrty was well under way the three conspirators — Jena, Frances, and Mabel — 
manipulated things so that Harold and Mabel found themselves seated alone 
on the same bench under the old holly tree rather remDved from the crowd. 
I'.'iabel was using all her powers of charm and wit, and was fairly beaming 
on Harold. 

But this was only one of the many similar situations occurring during the 
lollowing week. Every night there was either a dance or a card party or a 
lawn party, and during the day there were spend-the-day parties at the homes 
of the best families in Hilton; barbecues, horseback rides, fishing trips, and 



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sometimes a quiet and restful hour or two at home. On this account Harold's 
father had relieved him of most of his duties for a few days, and there was 
not much chance for him to get away and go to see that little girl down by the 
creek, and anyway it seemed that Mabel was keeping Harold's interests cen- 
tered on her own pretty self. One night after the party was over Harold and 
Mabel were alone on the front balcony "upstairs." 

"Miss Conway, I tell you I'm having a hard time these days. Before 
you came I was deeply in love with a little girl on our plantation named Ellen 
Jameson. She is poor, it is true, and has to work hard. A lot of times she 
helps her father in the fields. Her mother is dead, and she has to keep house 
for her father too. They have a small cottage way down on the creek at the 
back end of the plantation, and she keeps it just as neat and clean as our big 
house. She has lots of gocd sense, too, and has read quite a lot of the best 
books I have. She has a good mind, and is just as witty as she can be. And 
she's pretty ! Sister Jena knows that I have been paying her quite a lot of at- 
tention. Sis rides quite a lot and has seen us together several times when she 
was riding through the plantation. You may think I am a very foolish fellow 
to be £0 very frank with you. Miss Conway, and I suspect I am, for really, 
here of late you have almost set me on fire with your beauty and your at- 
tractive ways. In fact, I — I — I'm afraid I'm about to fall in love with 
you." 

It was one of those balmy spring nights when all the stars are out and 
the moon is doing its utmost to make the night as bright as day. The air 
seemed to have something in it that was fairly intoxicating, and Harold was 
becoming intoxicated. Both were silent for several minutes. Mabel was look- 
ing at the moon and trying to decide whether she was in love with Harold 
or merely trying to keep him from loving the little Jameson girl. Harold, on 
the other hand, was wrestling with the vision of Ellen that came to him 
just as he uttered those last words to Mabel. He could see her beautiful, 
earnest face overcast with a look of sorrow at the words he had just said 
Didn't he know that Ellen loved him truly, and that he could trust her con- 
stancy, and that her only defect was her pDverty. But what about this 
beautiful, airy, fairy maiden at his side, who had him in the grip of her 
charm? 

In the meantime something had happened at the little cottage down by 
the creek at the back of the plantation. About two o'clock Mr. Jameson 



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was awakened by a noise out at the chicken house, where the chickens were 
creating quite an uproar, as if something had disturbed them. He ran out to 
see what was wrong, and in his haste he stumbled and fell heavily against the 
oak tree in the back yard. Ellen, who had been awakened by the noise also, 
rushed out and found that he had hit his head such a blow as to render him 
unconscious. She got him in the house after a great struggle, and ran over 
to old Ned Peters' house nearby, aroused him and sent him to the Big House 
at full speed. Ned's mule carried him to the Big House in record time. 
Leaving his mule at the front gate, Ned rushed up to the side door of the 
house and knocked frantically. This knock came in the midst of Harold's re- 
flections, and brought him back to earth with a thud. He rushed to the door 
to see what the trouble was. He immediately recognized old Ned's voice. 

"Old nigger, what in the world are you doing disturbing us this time 
of night?" 

"Lawze, Marster, Mister Jemson done mos' kilt hisself. He done tuk 
and run agin er tree in his back yard. Miss Ellen done saunt me up head to 
tell you to send de doctor quick." 

"All right, Ned, you hurry on back down there, and do what you can 
for her, and I will get the doctor and start with him right away. Tell Miss 
Ellen that we will be there just as soon as we possibly can." 

Harold hurried back upstairs and told Mabel and excused himself. Old 
Dr. Carver lived close by, and they were soon on their way to the Jameson 
cottage, urging their horses to full speed. 

When they reached their destination Mr. Jameson was still unconscious, 
and kept mumbling something that was not quite understandable. The doctor 
administered a stimulant, and dressed the ugly gash in his head. All the time 
he kept up this mumbling. Finally Harold caught the words: "I'm not Ellen's 
fc:ther. Her father was Colonel Edwards. He gave her to my wife and me 
just before my wife died. I'm going to die." 

Harold, Ellen, and Dr. Carver looked at each other with mingled aston- 
ishment, surprise, and horror. It was Dr. Carver who first spoke. 

"This explains a mystery to me. I know you have heard your lather 
speak of Col. Edwards quite often. He was owner of the big plantation 
down near Sterling, about twenty miles from here. Col. Edward's wife died 
shortly after the birth of a baby girl. The Colonel began to drink heavily 
and to gamble, and before long he had gambled away his whole estate. He 
had an old maid keeping house for him and caring for the baby. One 



morning the housekeeper got up and found that the baby was not in the 
rco-Ti. Neither could she find CoL Edwards. And until this day neither 
the baby or Col. Edwards have been seen or heard of. I believe this story 
that Mr. Jameson has just hinted, for this is certainly the same girl. I re- 
member that little birthmark on her hand." 

During the speech of Dr. Carver, Ellen was almost hysterical. Harold 
feemed quite agitated. 

"Oh, what shall I do, Harold? I love you better than my life, but I 
know you will never be able to love me any more in all this mixup." 

Mr. Jameson soon recovered from this fracture of his skull, but he was 
left all alone now, except for his cook. Old Aunt Dinah, Ned's wife, and an 
occasional visit from Ellen, who now lived in the Big House. 

Mabel had stayed over for the wedding, and went back home feeling 
that this accident had solved a difficult problem, and had been fortunate for 
all concerned. 




/f= 



This Book is a Sample of Our Work 



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